Precocious puberty caused by an estrogen and androgen secreting adrenal adenoma: A case report and review of the current literature

Andrea M. Haqq, Phillip Silberberg, Cheryl Hanna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A recent study by Herman-Giddens has documented that the onset of puberty in normal girls is occurring at a younger age than in past generations. The normal range for clinical signs of puberty is now accepted to begin at 7 years in Caucasian girls and 6 years in African-American girls [1]. This discovery has prompted new recommendations regarding which girls with early signs of puberty to evaluate. In addition, the failure of LHRH analogue therapy to impact on adult height in girls between 6 to 8 years with central precocious puberty as compared to younger girls has reinforced the idea that puberty in this age group is a benign condition [2]. In most girls, precocious pubertal development is gonadotropin-dependent, due to early release of normal central nervous system suppression of the hypothalamus. Ninety-five percent of the time this is "idiopathic" rather than due to CNS abnormalities like tumors, infection or trauma. Uncommonly, early pubertal signs occur due to abnormal gonadotropin-independent production of estrogen or androgen from the ovary or adrenal gland. We present the case of a 6-year-old girl with an unusual adrenal tumor which produced both androgens and estrogens, thus mimicking central precocious puberty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-15
Number of pages7
JournalEndocrinologist
Volume11
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Precocious Puberty
Adenoma
Androgens
Estrogens
Puberty
Gonadotropins
Glandular and Epithelial Neoplasms
Adrenal Glands
Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone
African Americans
Hypothalamus
Ovary
Reference Values
Central Nervous System
Age Groups
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Precocious puberty caused by an estrogen and androgen secreting adrenal adenoma : A case report and review of the current literature. / Haqq, Andrea M.; Silberberg, Phillip; Hanna, Cheryl.

In: Endocrinologist, Vol. 11, No. 1, 2001, p. 9-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{31b3538a3f384ed9967bba427dfe6be7,
title = "Precocious puberty caused by an estrogen and androgen secreting adrenal adenoma: A case report and review of the current literature",
abstract = "A recent study by Herman-Giddens has documented that the onset of puberty in normal girls is occurring at a younger age than in past generations. The normal range for clinical signs of puberty is now accepted to begin at 7 years in Caucasian girls and 6 years in African-American girls [1]. This discovery has prompted new recommendations regarding which girls with early signs of puberty to evaluate. In addition, the failure of LHRH analogue therapy to impact on adult height in girls between 6 to 8 years with central precocious puberty as compared to younger girls has reinforced the idea that puberty in this age group is a benign condition [2]. In most girls, precocious pubertal development is gonadotropin-dependent, due to early release of normal central nervous system suppression of the hypothalamus. Ninety-five percent of the time this is {"}idiopathic{"} rather than due to CNS abnormalities like tumors, infection or trauma. Uncommonly, early pubertal signs occur due to abnormal gonadotropin-independent production of estrogen or androgen from the ovary or adrenal gland. We present the case of a 6-year-old girl with an unusual adrenal tumor which produced both androgens and estrogens, thus mimicking central precocious puberty.",
author = "Haqq, {Andrea M.} and Phillip Silberberg and Cheryl Hanna",
year = "2001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
pages = "9--15",
journal = "Endocrinologist",
issn = "1051-2144",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Precocious puberty caused by an estrogen and androgen secreting adrenal adenoma

T2 - A case report and review of the current literature

AU - Haqq, Andrea M.

AU - Silberberg, Phillip

AU - Hanna, Cheryl

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - A recent study by Herman-Giddens has documented that the onset of puberty in normal girls is occurring at a younger age than in past generations. The normal range for clinical signs of puberty is now accepted to begin at 7 years in Caucasian girls and 6 years in African-American girls [1]. This discovery has prompted new recommendations regarding which girls with early signs of puberty to evaluate. In addition, the failure of LHRH analogue therapy to impact on adult height in girls between 6 to 8 years with central precocious puberty as compared to younger girls has reinforced the idea that puberty in this age group is a benign condition [2]. In most girls, precocious pubertal development is gonadotropin-dependent, due to early release of normal central nervous system suppression of the hypothalamus. Ninety-five percent of the time this is "idiopathic" rather than due to CNS abnormalities like tumors, infection or trauma. Uncommonly, early pubertal signs occur due to abnormal gonadotropin-independent production of estrogen or androgen from the ovary or adrenal gland. We present the case of a 6-year-old girl with an unusual adrenal tumor which produced both androgens and estrogens, thus mimicking central precocious puberty.

AB - A recent study by Herman-Giddens has documented that the onset of puberty in normal girls is occurring at a younger age than in past generations. The normal range for clinical signs of puberty is now accepted to begin at 7 years in Caucasian girls and 6 years in African-American girls [1]. This discovery has prompted new recommendations regarding which girls with early signs of puberty to evaluate. In addition, the failure of LHRH analogue therapy to impact on adult height in girls between 6 to 8 years with central precocious puberty as compared to younger girls has reinforced the idea that puberty in this age group is a benign condition [2]. In most girls, precocious pubertal development is gonadotropin-dependent, due to early release of normal central nervous system suppression of the hypothalamus. Ninety-five percent of the time this is "idiopathic" rather than due to CNS abnormalities like tumors, infection or trauma. Uncommonly, early pubertal signs occur due to abnormal gonadotropin-independent production of estrogen or androgen from the ovary or adrenal gland. We present the case of a 6-year-old girl with an unusual adrenal tumor which produced both androgens and estrogens, thus mimicking central precocious puberty.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035123302&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035123302&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0035123302

VL - 11

SP - 9

EP - 15

JO - Endocrinologist

JF - Endocrinologist

SN - 1051-2144

IS - 1

ER -