Precision oncology: Origins, optimism, and potential

Vinay Prasad, Tito Fojo, Michael Brada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Imatinib, the first and arguably the best targeted therapy, became the springboard for developing drugs aimed at molecular targets deemed crucial to tumours. As this development unfolded, a revolution in the speed and cost of genetic sequencing occurred. The result-an armamentarium of drugs and an array of molecular targets-set the stage for precision oncology, a hypothesis that cancer treatment could be markedly improved if therapies were guided by a tumour's genomic alterations. Drawing lessons from the biological basis of cancer and recent empirical investigations, we take a more measured view of precision oncology's promise. Ultimately, the promise is not our concern, but the threshold at which we declare success. We review reports of precision oncology alongside those of precision diagnostics and novel radiotherapy approaches. Although confirmatory evidence is scarce, these interventions have been widely endorsed. We conclude that the current path will probably not be successful or, at a minimum, will have to undergo substantive adjustments before it can be successful. For the sake of patients with cancer, we hope one form of precision oncology will deliver on its promise. However, until confirmatory studies are completed, precision oncology remains unproven, and as such, a hypothesis in need of rigorous testing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e81-e86
JournalThe Lancet Oncology
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neoplasms
Social Adjustment
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Radiotherapy
Therapeutics
Optimism
Costs and Cost Analysis
Imatinib Mesylate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Precision oncology : Origins, optimism, and potential. / Prasad, Vinay; Fojo, Tito; Brada, Michael.

In: The Lancet Oncology, Vol. 17, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. e81-e86.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Prasad, Vinay ; Fojo, Tito ; Brada, Michael. / Precision oncology : Origins, optimism, and potential. In: The Lancet Oncology. 2016 ; Vol. 17, No. 2. pp. e81-e86.
@article{0999760a8b954a9c8fa60e12edbd163e,
title = "Precision oncology: Origins, optimism, and potential",
abstract = "Imatinib, the first and arguably the best targeted therapy, became the springboard for developing drugs aimed at molecular targets deemed crucial to tumours. As this development unfolded, a revolution in the speed and cost of genetic sequencing occurred. The result-an armamentarium of drugs and an array of molecular targets-set the stage for precision oncology, a hypothesis that cancer treatment could be markedly improved if therapies were guided by a tumour's genomic alterations. Drawing lessons from the biological basis of cancer and recent empirical investigations, we take a more measured view of precision oncology's promise. Ultimately, the promise is not our concern, but the threshold at which we declare success. We review reports of precision oncology alongside those of precision diagnostics and novel radiotherapy approaches. Although confirmatory evidence is scarce, these interventions have been widely endorsed. We conclude that the current path will probably not be successful or, at a minimum, will have to undergo substantive adjustments before it can be successful. For the sake of patients with cancer, we hope one form of precision oncology will deliver on its promise. However, until confirmatory studies are completed, precision oncology remains unproven, and as such, a hypothesis in need of rigorous testing.",
author = "Vinay Prasad and Tito Fojo and Michael Brada",
year = "2016",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S1470-2045(15)00620-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "e81--e86",
journal = "The Lancet Oncology",
issn = "1470-2045",
publisher = "Lancet Publishing Group",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Precision oncology

T2 - Origins, optimism, and potential

AU - Prasad, Vinay

AU - Fojo, Tito

AU - Brada, Michael

PY - 2016/2/1

Y1 - 2016/2/1

N2 - Imatinib, the first and arguably the best targeted therapy, became the springboard for developing drugs aimed at molecular targets deemed crucial to tumours. As this development unfolded, a revolution in the speed and cost of genetic sequencing occurred. The result-an armamentarium of drugs and an array of molecular targets-set the stage for precision oncology, a hypothesis that cancer treatment could be markedly improved if therapies were guided by a tumour's genomic alterations. Drawing lessons from the biological basis of cancer and recent empirical investigations, we take a more measured view of precision oncology's promise. Ultimately, the promise is not our concern, but the threshold at which we declare success. We review reports of precision oncology alongside those of precision diagnostics and novel radiotherapy approaches. Although confirmatory evidence is scarce, these interventions have been widely endorsed. We conclude that the current path will probably not be successful or, at a minimum, will have to undergo substantive adjustments before it can be successful. For the sake of patients with cancer, we hope one form of precision oncology will deliver on its promise. However, until confirmatory studies are completed, precision oncology remains unproven, and as such, a hypothesis in need of rigorous testing.

AB - Imatinib, the first and arguably the best targeted therapy, became the springboard for developing drugs aimed at molecular targets deemed crucial to tumours. As this development unfolded, a revolution in the speed and cost of genetic sequencing occurred. The result-an armamentarium of drugs and an array of molecular targets-set the stage for precision oncology, a hypothesis that cancer treatment could be markedly improved if therapies were guided by a tumour's genomic alterations. Drawing lessons from the biological basis of cancer and recent empirical investigations, we take a more measured view of precision oncology's promise. Ultimately, the promise is not our concern, but the threshold at which we declare success. We review reports of precision oncology alongside those of precision diagnostics and novel radiotherapy approaches. Although confirmatory evidence is scarce, these interventions have been widely endorsed. We conclude that the current path will probably not be successful or, at a minimum, will have to undergo substantive adjustments before it can be successful. For the sake of patients with cancer, we hope one form of precision oncology will deliver on its promise. However, until confirmatory studies are completed, precision oncology remains unproven, and as such, a hypothesis in need of rigorous testing.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84959311037&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84959311037&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S1470-2045(15)00620-8

DO - 10.1016/S1470-2045(15)00620-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 26868357

AN - SCOPUS:84959311037

VL - 17

SP - e81-e86

JO - The Lancet Oncology

JF - The Lancet Oncology

SN - 1470-2045

IS - 2

ER -