Precipitating Circumstances of Suicide and Alcohol Intoxication Among U.S. Ethnic Groups

Raul Caetano, Mark S. Kaplan, Nathalie Huguet, Kenneth Conner, Bentson McFarland, Norman Giesbrecht, Kurt B. Nolte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Our goal was to assess the prevalence of 9 different types of precipitating circumstances among suicide decedents, and examine the association between circumstances and postmortem blood alcohol concentration (BAC ≥ 0.08 g/dl) across U.S. ethnic groups. Methods: Data come from the restricted 2003 to 2011 National Violent Death Reporting System, with postmortem information on 59,384 male and female suicide decedents for 17 U.S. states. Results: Among men, precipitating circumstances statistically associated with a BAC ≥ 0.08 g/dl were physical health and job problems for Blacks, and experiencing a crisis, physical health problems, and intimate partner problem for Hispanics. Among women, the only precipitating circumstance associated with a BAC ≥ 0.08 g/dl was substance abuse problems other than alcohol for Blacks. The number of precipitating circumstances present before the suicide was negatively associated with a BAC ≥ 0.08 g/dl for Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics. Conclusions: Selected precipitating circumstances were associated with a BAC ≥ 0.08 g/dl, and the strongest determinant of this level of alcohol intoxication prior to suicide among all ethnic groups was the presence of an alcohol problem.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1510-1517
Number of pages8
JournalAlcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research
Volume39
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

Fingerprint

Alcoholic Intoxication
Ethnic Groups
Suicide
Alcohols
Hispanic Americans
Health
Medical problems
Substance-Related Disorders
Blood

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • National Violent Death Reporting System
  • Precipitating Circumstances
  • Race/Ethnicity
  • Suicide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Toxicology

Cite this

Caetano, R., Kaplan, M. S., Huguet, N., Conner, K., McFarland, B., Giesbrecht, N., & Nolte, K. B. (2015). Precipitating Circumstances of Suicide and Alcohol Intoxication Among U.S. Ethnic Groups. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 39(8), 1510-1517. https://doi.org/10.1111/acer.12788

Precipitating Circumstances of Suicide and Alcohol Intoxication Among U.S. Ethnic Groups. / Caetano, Raul; Kaplan, Mark S.; Huguet, Nathalie; Conner, Kenneth; McFarland, Bentson; Giesbrecht, Norman; Nolte, Kurt B.

In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, Vol. 39, No. 8, 01.08.2015, p. 1510-1517.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Caetano, R, Kaplan, MS, Huguet, N, Conner, K, McFarland, B, Giesbrecht, N & Nolte, KB 2015, 'Precipitating Circumstances of Suicide and Alcohol Intoxication Among U.S. Ethnic Groups', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 39, no. 8, pp. 1510-1517. https://doi.org/10.1111/acer.12788
Caetano, Raul ; Kaplan, Mark S. ; Huguet, Nathalie ; Conner, Kenneth ; McFarland, Bentson ; Giesbrecht, Norman ; Nolte, Kurt B. / Precipitating Circumstances of Suicide and Alcohol Intoxication Among U.S. Ethnic Groups. In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. 2015 ; Vol. 39, No. 8. pp. 1510-1517.
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