Postural compensation for vestibular loss

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To what extent can remaining sensory information and/or sensory biofeedback (BF) compensate for loss of vestibular information in controlling postural equilibrium? The primary role of the vestibulospinal system is as a vertical reference for control of the trunk in space, with increasing importance as the surface becomes increasingly unstable. Our studies with patients with bilateral loss of vestibular function show that vision or light touch from a fingertip can substitute as a reference for earth vertical to decrease variability of trunk sway when standing on an unstable surface. However, some patients with bilateral loss compensate better than others, and found that those with more complete loss of bilateral vestibular function compensate better than those with measurable vestibulo-ocular reflexes. In contrast, patients with unilateral vestibular loss (UVL) who reweight sensory dependence to rely on their remaining unilateral vestibular function show better functional performance than those who do not increase vestibular weighting on an unstable surface. Light touch of

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Pages76-81
Number of pages6
Volume1164
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2009

Publication series

NameAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1164
ISSN (Print)00778923
ISSN (Electronic)17496632

Fingerprint

Touch
Postural Balance
Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex
Biofeedback
Earth (planet)
Compensation and Redress
Bilateral Vestibulopathy
Biofeedback (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Compensation
  • Posture
  • Rehabilitation
  • Vestibular loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Horak, F. (2009). Postural compensation for vestibular loss. In Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (Vol. 1164, pp. 76-81). (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; Vol. 1164). https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.2008.03708.x

Postural compensation for vestibular loss. / Horak, Fay.

Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1164 2009. p. 76-81 (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; Vol. 1164).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Horak, F 2009, Postural compensation for vestibular loss. in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. vol. 1164, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 1164, pp. 76-81. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.2008.03708.x
Horak F. Postural compensation for vestibular loss. In Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1164. 2009. p. 76-81. (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences). https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.2008.03708.x
Horak, Fay. / Postural compensation for vestibular loss. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1164 2009. pp. 76-81 (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences).
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