Postural after-effects of stepping on an inclined surface

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In previous studies, blindfolded, healthy subjects exhibited an after-effect of leaning while standing on a horizontal surface after a period of standing on an inclined surface. We investigated whether this kinesthetic after-effect would transfer from one task to another by asking blindfolded subjects to stand on a horizontal surface after stepping-in-place on an incline. Results showed that all subjects demonstrated a forward trunk leaning after-effect lasting from half a minute to over 6 min after stepping on a 10°-toes-up incline for 2.5 min. For 5/7 subjects, the amplitude of the leaning after-effect was very similar following stepping or standing on the inclined surface. The similarity of the post-incline lean between the standing and stepping conditions suggests a common underlying mechanism for the after-effect following standing and walking on a gradient and suggests that prolonged maintenance of a constant ankle or leg posture is not a prerequisite condition for the after-effect. The transfer of a postural effect built-up during a locomotor task to a postural after-effect during a standing task is consistent with a central adaptive mechanism that adjusts the surface-referenced set point for whole body postural orientation for both gait and posture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-98
Number of pages6
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume413
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 14 2007

Fingerprint

Posture
Toes
Gait
Ankle
Walking
Leg
Healthy Volunteers
Maintenance

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Gait
  • Generalization
  • Incline
  • Locomotion
  • Postural orientation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Postural after-effects of stepping on an inclined surface. / Kluzik, JoAnn; Horak, Fay; Peterka, Robert (Bob).

In: Neuroscience Letters, Vol. 413, No. 2, 14.02.2007, p. 93-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6b8527bc58b14082b38d9df8abb72af0,
title = "Postural after-effects of stepping on an inclined surface",
abstract = "In previous studies, blindfolded, healthy subjects exhibited an after-effect of leaning while standing on a horizontal surface after a period of standing on an inclined surface. We investigated whether this kinesthetic after-effect would transfer from one task to another by asking blindfolded subjects to stand on a horizontal surface after stepping-in-place on an incline. Results showed that all subjects demonstrated a forward trunk leaning after-effect lasting from half a minute to over 6 min after stepping on a 10°-toes-up incline for 2.5 min. For 5/7 subjects, the amplitude of the leaning after-effect was very similar following stepping or standing on the inclined surface. The similarity of the post-incline lean between the standing and stepping conditions suggests a common underlying mechanism for the after-effect following standing and walking on a gradient and suggests that prolonged maintenance of a constant ankle or leg posture is not a prerequisite condition for the after-effect. The transfer of a postural effect built-up during a locomotor task to a postural after-effect during a standing task is consistent with a central adaptive mechanism that adjusts the surface-referenced set point for whole body postural orientation for both gait and posture.",
keywords = "Adaptation, Gait, Generalization, Incline, Locomotion, Postural orientation",
author = "JoAnn Kluzik and Fay Horak and Peterka, {Robert (Bob)}",
year = "2007",
month = "2",
day = "14",
doi = "10.1016/j.neulet.2006.11.034",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "413",
pages = "93--98",
journal = "Neuroscience Letters",
issn = "0304-3940",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Postural after-effects of stepping on an inclined surface

AU - Kluzik, JoAnn

AU - Horak, Fay

AU - Peterka, Robert (Bob)

PY - 2007/2/14

Y1 - 2007/2/14

N2 - In previous studies, blindfolded, healthy subjects exhibited an after-effect of leaning while standing on a horizontal surface after a period of standing on an inclined surface. We investigated whether this kinesthetic after-effect would transfer from one task to another by asking blindfolded subjects to stand on a horizontal surface after stepping-in-place on an incline. Results showed that all subjects demonstrated a forward trunk leaning after-effect lasting from half a minute to over 6 min after stepping on a 10°-toes-up incline for 2.5 min. For 5/7 subjects, the amplitude of the leaning after-effect was very similar following stepping or standing on the inclined surface. The similarity of the post-incline lean between the standing and stepping conditions suggests a common underlying mechanism for the after-effect following standing and walking on a gradient and suggests that prolonged maintenance of a constant ankle or leg posture is not a prerequisite condition for the after-effect. The transfer of a postural effect built-up during a locomotor task to a postural after-effect during a standing task is consistent with a central adaptive mechanism that adjusts the surface-referenced set point for whole body postural orientation for both gait and posture.

AB - In previous studies, blindfolded, healthy subjects exhibited an after-effect of leaning while standing on a horizontal surface after a period of standing on an inclined surface. We investigated whether this kinesthetic after-effect would transfer from one task to another by asking blindfolded subjects to stand on a horizontal surface after stepping-in-place on an incline. Results showed that all subjects demonstrated a forward trunk leaning after-effect lasting from half a minute to over 6 min after stepping on a 10°-toes-up incline for 2.5 min. For 5/7 subjects, the amplitude of the leaning after-effect was very similar following stepping or standing on the inclined surface. The similarity of the post-incline lean between the standing and stepping conditions suggests a common underlying mechanism for the after-effect following standing and walking on a gradient and suggests that prolonged maintenance of a constant ankle or leg posture is not a prerequisite condition for the after-effect. The transfer of a postural effect built-up during a locomotor task to a postural after-effect during a standing task is consistent with a central adaptive mechanism that adjusts the surface-referenced set point for whole body postural orientation for both gait and posture.

KW - Adaptation

KW - Gait

KW - Generalization

KW - Incline

KW - Locomotion

KW - Postural orientation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33846630370&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33846630370&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.neulet.2006.11.034

DO - 10.1016/j.neulet.2006.11.034

M3 - Article

VL - 413

SP - 93

EP - 98

JO - Neuroscience Letters

JF - Neuroscience Letters

SN - 0304-3940

IS - 2

ER -