Post-transplant relapse

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the advances in the field of stem cell transplantation, relapse remains a major source of mortality. CIBMTR data identify relapse as the cause of death in 78% of autologous transplant patients, 34% of related allogeneic transplant patients, and 23% of unrelated transplant patients. With the advent of reduced intensity transplants allowing more patients to proceed with transplant, there have been reports of higher than anticipated relapses. Management of relapse post-transplant requires assessment of multiple host/recipient factors and often is limited by the compromised status of the recipient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationBlood and Marrow Transplant Handbook: Comprehensive Guide for Patient Care
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages271-276
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)9781441975058
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

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Transplants
Recurrence
Autografts
Stem Cell Transplantation
Cause of Death
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Maziarz, R., & Slater, S. (2011). Post-transplant relapse. In Blood and Marrow Transplant Handbook: Comprehensive Guide for Patient Care (pp. 271-276). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-7506-5_24

Post-transplant relapse. / Maziarz, Richard; Slater, Susan.

Blood and Marrow Transplant Handbook: Comprehensive Guide for Patient Care. Springer New York, 2011. p. 271-276.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Maziarz, R & Slater, S 2011, Post-transplant relapse. in Blood and Marrow Transplant Handbook: Comprehensive Guide for Patient Care. Springer New York, pp. 271-276. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-7506-5_24
Maziarz R, Slater S. Post-transplant relapse. In Blood and Marrow Transplant Handbook: Comprehensive Guide for Patient Care. Springer New York. 2011. p. 271-276 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-7506-5_24
Maziarz, Richard ; Slater, Susan. / Post-transplant relapse. Blood and Marrow Transplant Handbook: Comprehensive Guide for Patient Care. Springer New York, 2011. pp. 271-276
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