Possible role of zonula occludens of the myelin sheath in demyelinating conditions

Enrico Mugnaini, Bruce Schnapp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

AUTOIMMUNE mechanisms may play a major role in several human demyelinating diseases1. Myelin contains components, principally a basic class of protein, which, when injected systemically with an adjuvant, elicit in the experimental animal a demyelinating encephalomyelitis or neuritis with perivascular infiltration of lymphocytes and inflammatory cells1,2. A satisfactory hypothesis is that the potential self-antigens are secluded from the immune systems in the normal living animal3. Evidence for such a specific compartmentation of myelin components, however, has been lacking up to now. This has led several authors to suggest alternative explanations 1,4,5. Here we demonstrate the structural basis for a seclusion mechanism within both peripheral and central myelin sheaths in different animal species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)725-727
Number of pages3
JournalNature
Volume251
Issue number5477
DOIs
StatePublished - 1974
Externally publishedYes

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Tight Junctions
Myelin Sheath
Encephalomyelitis
Neuritis
Autoantigens
Immune System
Lymphocytes
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Possible role of zonula occludens of the myelin sheath in demyelinating conditions. / Mugnaini, Enrico; Schnapp, Bruce.

In: Nature, Vol. 251, No. 5477, 1974, p. 725-727.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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