Polarized light imaging specifies the anisotropy of light scattering in the superficial layer of a tissue

Steven Jacques, Stéphane Roussel, Ravikant Samatham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This report describes how optical images acquired using linearly polarized light can specify the anisotropy of scattering (g) and the ratio of reduced scattering [μs′=μs(1-g)] to absorption (μa), i.e., N′=μs′/μa. A camera acquired copolarized (HH) and crosspolarized (HV) reflectance images of a tissue (skin), which yielded images based on the intensity (I=HH+HV) and difference (Q=HH-HV) of reflectance images. Monte Carlo simulations generated an analysis grid (or lookup table), which mapped Q and I into a grid of g versus N′, i.e., g(Q,I) and N′(Q,I). The anisotropy g is interesting because it is sensitive to the submicrometer structure of biological tissues. Hence, polarized light imaging can monitor shifts in the submicrometer (50 to 1000 nm) structure of tissues. The Q values for forearm skin on two subjects (one Caucasian, one pigmented) were in the range of 0.046±0.007 (24), which is the mean±SD for 24 measurements on 8 skin sites×3 visible wavelengths, 470, 524, and 625 nm, which indicated g values of 0.67±0.07 (24).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number071115
JournalJournal of Biomedical Optics
Volume21
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Fingerprint

Light polarization
Light scattering
polarized light
Skin
Anisotropy
light scattering
Tissue
Imaging techniques
anisotropy
Scattering
Table lookup
grids
forearm
reflectance
Cameras
scattering
Wavelength
cameras
shift
wavelengths

Keywords

  • Anisotropy
  • Biological tissues
  • Biomedical optics
  • Polarized light
  • Scattering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

Polarized light imaging specifies the anisotropy of light scattering in the superficial layer of a tissue. / Jacques, Steven; Roussel, Stéphane; Samatham, Ravikant.

In: Journal of Biomedical Optics, Vol. 21, No. 7, 071115, 01.07.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jacques, Steven ; Roussel, Stéphane ; Samatham, Ravikant. / Polarized light imaging specifies the anisotropy of light scattering in the superficial layer of a tissue. In: Journal of Biomedical Optics. 2016 ; Vol. 21, No. 7.
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