Plasma C-reactive protein concentration is not affected by isocaloric dietary fat reduction

Mikhail S. Koren, Jonathan Purnell, Patricia A. Breen, Colleen C. Matthys, Holly S. Callahan, David S. Weigle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: There is a strong correlation between plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration and risk of cardiovascular death. Low-fat diets have been recommended for maintenance of cardiovascular health, and it is known that a low-fat diet associated with weight loss lowers CRP concentration. However, it remains unclear whether dietary fat has an effect independent from weight change on markers of inflammation. Methods: Sixteen overweight subjects who were 46 ± 14 y old were placed on a weight-maintaining baseline diet consisting of 35% fat, 45% carbohydrate, and 20% energy as protein. After 2 wk, subjects were switched to an isocaloric low-fat diet consisting of 15% fat, 65% carbohydrate, and 20% protein for another 2 wk. For the final 12 wk of the study, subjects consumed the same 15% fat diet ad libitum. At the end of each diet phase, CRP was measured by a high-sensitivity CRP assay. Results: The weight of subjects remained stable during the first 4 wk of isocaloric diets. Plasma CRP concentrations after 2 wk on the weight-maintaining 35% fat diet and 2 wk on the isocaloric 15% fat diet were not significantly different (median ± interquartile range 1.42 ± 3.30 and 1.59 ± 3.29 mg/L, respectively). Three months of ad libitum low-fat diet consumption resulted in a 4.1 ± 0.7 kg weight loss associated with a decrease in CRP concentration to 1.17 ± 2.03 mg/L (P = 0.03). Conclusion: Loss of body weight decreases CRP concentration, but a decrease in dietary fat without a concurrent change in body weight does not affect CRP concentration in overweight healthy subjects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)444-448
Number of pages5
JournalNutrition
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

Fingerprint

Dietary Fats
C-Reactive Protein
Blood Proteins
Fat-Restricted Diet
Diet
Fats
Weights and Measures
Weight Loss
Carbohydrates
Body Weight Changes
Healthy Volunteers
Proteins
Body Weight
Inflammation
Health

Keywords

  • Body weight
  • C-reactive protein
  • Diet
  • Dietary fats
  • Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Surgery
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Koren, M. S., Purnell, J., Breen, P. A., Matthys, C. C., Callahan, H. S., & Weigle, D. S. (2006). Plasma C-reactive protein concentration is not affected by isocaloric dietary fat reduction. Nutrition, 22(4), 444-448. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nut.2005.06.012

Plasma C-reactive protein concentration is not affected by isocaloric dietary fat reduction. / Koren, Mikhail S.; Purnell, Jonathan; Breen, Patricia A.; Matthys, Colleen C.; Callahan, Holly S.; Weigle, David S.

In: Nutrition, Vol. 22, No. 4, 04.2006, p. 444-448.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Koren, MS, Purnell, J, Breen, PA, Matthys, CC, Callahan, HS & Weigle, DS 2006, 'Plasma C-reactive protein concentration is not affected by isocaloric dietary fat reduction', Nutrition, vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 444-448. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nut.2005.06.012
Koren, Mikhail S. ; Purnell, Jonathan ; Breen, Patricia A. ; Matthys, Colleen C. ; Callahan, Holly S. ; Weigle, David S. / Plasma C-reactive protein concentration is not affected by isocaloric dietary fat reduction. In: Nutrition. 2006 ; Vol. 22, No. 4. pp. 444-448.
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abstract = "Objective: There is a strong correlation between plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration and risk of cardiovascular death. Low-fat diets have been recommended for maintenance of cardiovascular health, and it is known that a low-fat diet associated with weight loss lowers CRP concentration. However, it remains unclear whether dietary fat has an effect independent from weight change on markers of inflammation. Methods: Sixteen overweight subjects who were 46 ± 14 y old were placed on a weight-maintaining baseline diet consisting of 35{\%} fat, 45{\%} carbohydrate, and 20{\%} energy as protein. After 2 wk, subjects were switched to an isocaloric low-fat diet consisting of 15{\%} fat, 65{\%} carbohydrate, and 20{\%} protein for another 2 wk. For the final 12 wk of the study, subjects consumed the same 15{\%} fat diet ad libitum. At the end of each diet phase, CRP was measured by a high-sensitivity CRP assay. Results: The weight of subjects remained stable during the first 4 wk of isocaloric diets. Plasma CRP concentrations after 2 wk on the weight-maintaining 35{\%} fat diet and 2 wk on the isocaloric 15{\%} fat diet were not significantly different (median ± interquartile range 1.42 ± 3.30 and 1.59 ± 3.29 mg/L, respectively). Three months of ad libitum low-fat diet consumption resulted in a 4.1 ± 0.7 kg weight loss associated with a decrease in CRP concentration to 1.17 ± 2.03 mg/L (P = 0.03). Conclusion: Loss of body weight decreases CRP concentration, but a decrease in dietary fat without a concurrent change in body weight does not affect CRP concentration in overweight healthy subjects.",
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AU - Callahan, Holly S.

AU - Weigle, David S.

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N2 - Objective: There is a strong correlation between plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration and risk of cardiovascular death. Low-fat diets have been recommended for maintenance of cardiovascular health, and it is known that a low-fat diet associated with weight loss lowers CRP concentration. However, it remains unclear whether dietary fat has an effect independent from weight change on markers of inflammation. Methods: Sixteen overweight subjects who were 46 ± 14 y old were placed on a weight-maintaining baseline diet consisting of 35% fat, 45% carbohydrate, and 20% energy as protein. After 2 wk, subjects were switched to an isocaloric low-fat diet consisting of 15% fat, 65% carbohydrate, and 20% protein for another 2 wk. For the final 12 wk of the study, subjects consumed the same 15% fat diet ad libitum. At the end of each diet phase, CRP was measured by a high-sensitivity CRP assay. Results: The weight of subjects remained stable during the first 4 wk of isocaloric diets. Plasma CRP concentrations after 2 wk on the weight-maintaining 35% fat diet and 2 wk on the isocaloric 15% fat diet were not significantly different (median ± interquartile range 1.42 ± 3.30 and 1.59 ± 3.29 mg/L, respectively). Three months of ad libitum low-fat diet consumption resulted in a 4.1 ± 0.7 kg weight loss associated with a decrease in CRP concentration to 1.17 ± 2.03 mg/L (P = 0.03). Conclusion: Loss of body weight decreases CRP concentration, but a decrease in dietary fat without a concurrent change in body weight does not affect CRP concentration in overweight healthy subjects.

AB - Objective: There is a strong correlation between plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration and risk of cardiovascular death. Low-fat diets have been recommended for maintenance of cardiovascular health, and it is known that a low-fat diet associated with weight loss lowers CRP concentration. However, it remains unclear whether dietary fat has an effect independent from weight change on markers of inflammation. Methods: Sixteen overweight subjects who were 46 ± 14 y old were placed on a weight-maintaining baseline diet consisting of 35% fat, 45% carbohydrate, and 20% energy as protein. After 2 wk, subjects were switched to an isocaloric low-fat diet consisting of 15% fat, 65% carbohydrate, and 20% protein for another 2 wk. For the final 12 wk of the study, subjects consumed the same 15% fat diet ad libitum. At the end of each diet phase, CRP was measured by a high-sensitivity CRP assay. Results: The weight of subjects remained stable during the first 4 wk of isocaloric diets. Plasma CRP concentrations after 2 wk on the weight-maintaining 35% fat diet and 2 wk on the isocaloric 15% fat diet were not significantly different (median ± interquartile range 1.42 ± 3.30 and 1.59 ± 3.29 mg/L, respectively). Three months of ad libitum low-fat diet consumption resulted in a 4.1 ± 0.7 kg weight loss associated with a decrease in CRP concentration to 1.17 ± 2.03 mg/L (P = 0.03). Conclusion: Loss of body weight decreases CRP concentration, but a decrease in dietary fat without a concurrent change in body weight does not affect CRP concentration in overweight healthy subjects.

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