Place of death in the population dying from diseases indicative of palliative care need: A cross-national population-level study in 14 countries

EURO IMPACT

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Abstract

Background Studying where people die across countries can serve as an evidence base for health policy on end-of-life care. This study describes the place of death of people who died from diseases indicative of palliative care need in 14 countries, the association of place of death with cause of death, sociodemographic and healthcare availability characteristics in each country and the extent to which these characteristics explain country differences in the place of death. Methods Death certificate data for all deaths in 2008 (age >1 year) in Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, England, France, Hungary, Italy, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, South Korea, Spain (Andalusia), the USA and Wales caused by cancer, heart/ renal/liver failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diseases of the nervous system or HIV/AIDS were linked with national or regional healthcare statistics (N=2 220 997). Results 13% (Canada) to 53% (Mexico) of people died at home and 25% (the Netherlands) to 85% (South Korea) died in hospital. The strength and direction of associations between home death and cause of death, sociodemographic and healthcare availability factors differed between countries. Differences between countries in home versus hospital death were only partly explained by differences in these factors. Conclusions The large differences between countries in and beyond Europe in the place of death of people in potential need of palliative care are not entirely attributable to sociodemographic characteristics, cause of death or availability of healthcare resources, which suggests that countries' palliative and end-of-life care policies may influence where people die.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-24
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Volume70
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 22 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Palliative Care
Population
Delivery of Health Care
Cause of Death
Republic of Korea
Terminal Care
Mexico
Netherlands
Canada
Heart Neoplasms
Death Certificates
Hungary
Czech Republic
Belgium
Wales
Liver Failure
Health Policy
Nervous System Diseases
New Zealand
England

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{208fb45593b943858e404b54438dbfb7,
title = "Place of death in the population dying from diseases indicative of palliative care need: A cross-national population-level study in 14 countries",
abstract = "Background Studying where people die across countries can serve as an evidence base for health policy on end-of-life care. This study describes the place of death of people who died from diseases indicative of palliative care need in 14 countries, the association of place of death with cause of death, sociodemographic and healthcare availability characteristics in each country and the extent to which these characteristics explain country differences in the place of death. Methods Death certificate data for all deaths in 2008 (age >1 year) in Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, England, France, Hungary, Italy, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, South Korea, Spain (Andalusia), the USA and Wales caused by cancer, heart/ renal/liver failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diseases of the nervous system or HIV/AIDS were linked with national or regional healthcare statistics (N=2 220 997). Results 13{\%} (Canada) to 53{\%} (Mexico) of people died at home and 25{\%} (the Netherlands) to 85{\%} (South Korea) died in hospital. The strength and direction of associations between home death and cause of death, sociodemographic and healthcare availability factors differed between countries. Differences between countries in home versus hospital death were only partly explained by differences in these factors. Conclusions The large differences between countries in and beyond Europe in the place of death of people in potential need of palliative care are not entirely attributable to sociodemographic characteristics, cause of death or availability of healthcare resources, which suggests that countries' palliative and end-of-life care policies may influence where people die.",
author = "{EURO IMPACT} and Lara Pivodic and Koen Pardon and Lucas Morin and Julia Addington-Hall and Guido Miccinesi and Marylou Cardenas-Turanzas and Bregje Onwuteaka-Philipsen and Wayne Naylor and Ramos, {Miguel Ruiz} and {Van den Block}, Lieve and Wilson, {Donna M.} and Martin Loucka and Agnes Csikos and Rhee, {Yong Joo} and Joan Teno and Luc Deliens and Dirk Houttekier and Joachim Cohen and {De Groote}, {Zeger D.} and Sheila Payne and Sarah Brearley and Augusto Caraceni and Roeline Pasman and Anneke Francke and Richard Harding and Higginson, {Irene J.} and Stein Kaasa and Karin Linden and Sophie Pautex",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
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doi = "10.1136/jech-2014-205365",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "70",
pages = "17--24",
journal = "Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health",
issn = "0143-005X",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Place of death in the population dying from diseases indicative of palliative care need

T2 - A cross-national population-level study in 14 countries

AU - EURO IMPACT

AU - Pivodic, Lara

AU - Pardon, Koen

AU - Morin, Lucas

AU - Addington-Hall, Julia

AU - Miccinesi, Guido

AU - Cardenas-Turanzas, Marylou

AU - Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje

AU - Naylor, Wayne

AU - Ramos, Miguel Ruiz

AU - Van den Block, Lieve

AU - Wilson, Donna M.

AU - Loucka, Martin

AU - Csikos, Agnes

AU - Rhee, Yong Joo

AU - Teno, Joan

AU - Deliens, Luc

AU - Houttekier, Dirk

AU - Cohen, Joachim

AU - De Groote, Zeger D.

AU - Payne, Sheila

AU - Brearley, Sarah

AU - Caraceni, Augusto

AU - Pasman, Roeline

AU - Francke, Anneke

AU - Harding, Richard

AU - Higginson, Irene J.

AU - Kaasa, Stein

AU - Linden, Karin

AU - Pautex, Sophie

PY - 2016/7/22

Y1 - 2016/7/22

N2 - Background Studying where people die across countries can serve as an evidence base for health policy on end-of-life care. This study describes the place of death of people who died from diseases indicative of palliative care need in 14 countries, the association of place of death with cause of death, sociodemographic and healthcare availability characteristics in each country and the extent to which these characteristics explain country differences in the place of death. Methods Death certificate data for all deaths in 2008 (age >1 year) in Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, England, France, Hungary, Italy, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, South Korea, Spain (Andalusia), the USA and Wales caused by cancer, heart/ renal/liver failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diseases of the nervous system or HIV/AIDS were linked with national or regional healthcare statistics (N=2 220 997). Results 13% (Canada) to 53% (Mexico) of people died at home and 25% (the Netherlands) to 85% (South Korea) died in hospital. The strength and direction of associations between home death and cause of death, sociodemographic and healthcare availability factors differed between countries. Differences between countries in home versus hospital death were only partly explained by differences in these factors. Conclusions The large differences between countries in and beyond Europe in the place of death of people in potential need of palliative care are not entirely attributable to sociodemographic characteristics, cause of death or availability of healthcare resources, which suggests that countries' palliative and end-of-life care policies may influence where people die.

AB - Background Studying where people die across countries can serve as an evidence base for health policy on end-of-life care. This study describes the place of death of people who died from diseases indicative of palliative care need in 14 countries, the association of place of death with cause of death, sociodemographic and healthcare availability characteristics in each country and the extent to which these characteristics explain country differences in the place of death. Methods Death certificate data for all deaths in 2008 (age >1 year) in Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, England, France, Hungary, Italy, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, South Korea, Spain (Andalusia), the USA and Wales caused by cancer, heart/ renal/liver failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diseases of the nervous system or HIV/AIDS were linked with national or regional healthcare statistics (N=2 220 997). Results 13% (Canada) to 53% (Mexico) of people died at home and 25% (the Netherlands) to 85% (South Korea) died in hospital. The strength and direction of associations between home death and cause of death, sociodemographic and healthcare availability factors differed between countries. Differences between countries in home versus hospital death were only partly explained by differences in these factors. Conclusions The large differences between countries in and beyond Europe in the place of death of people in potential need of palliative care are not entirely attributable to sociodemographic characteristics, cause of death or availability of healthcare resources, which suggests that countries' palliative and end-of-life care policies may influence where people die.

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