Physiologic and psychosocial assessment in labor.

Carol Howe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The details of physiological and psychosocial assessment are available in many texts, and the techniques are relatively simple. Several assumptions underlie an excellent labor assessment: 1. that the nurse has a thorough knowledge of the physiological processes of pregnancy and labor; 2. that the nurse has a thorough knowledge of the psychosocial implications of pregnancy and labor; 3. that the nurse has the ability to set priorities and balance the focus of her assessment; 4. that the nurse has the ability to refrain from stereotyping the woman in labor; 5. that the nurse does not let her own expectations of feelings and behavior in labor mask what the patient is really experiencing; and 6. that the nurse is willing to follow up, evaluate, and reassess in order to verify her assessments and improve her assessment skills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-56
Number of pages8
JournalNursing Clinics of North America
Volume17
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1982
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nurses
Aptitude
Physiological Phenomena
Pregnancy
Stereotyping
Masks
Emotions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Physiologic and psychosocial assessment in labor. / Howe, Carol.

In: Nursing Clinics of North America, Vol. 17, No. 1, 03.1982, p. 49-56.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Howe, Carol. / Physiologic and psychosocial assessment in labor. In: Nursing Clinics of North America. 1982 ; Vol. 17, No. 1. pp. 49-56.
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