Physicians' responses to patient-requested cesarean delivery

Chiara Ghetti, Benjamin K S Chan, Jeanne-Marie Guise

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The issue about whether a woman's autonomy in childbirth should include the choice of cesarean delivery in the absence of medical indications has become a major source of debate. Our objective was to examine factors that determined physicians' responses to patient-requested cesarean delivery. Methods: Surveys were distributed to all obstetrician-gynecologists in the greater Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area in Spring, 2000. Physicians were asked to respond to scenarios involving a term patient with a singleton pregnancy requesting primary cesarean delivery. Results: One hundred and seventy of 255 physicians (67%) responded, of whom 68 to 98 percent agreed to cesarean delivery in cases with clear medical indications. Without a clear medical indication, most practitioners would not perform a cesarean delivery. In cases where medical indications were unclear, responses were divided. Physician male gender and patient high socioeconomic status were associated with increased likelihood of physician agreement to patient-requested cesarean delivery. Age, years in practice, and practice type were not associated with agreement. Conclusions: Physicians are reluctant to agree to patient request for primary cesarean delivery without a clear medical indication. Male physicians were more likely to agree to a patient's request for cesarean delivery than female physicians.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)280-284
Number of pages5
JournalBirth
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2004

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Physicians
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Parturition
Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Physicians' responses to patient-requested cesarean delivery. / Ghetti, Chiara; Chan, Benjamin K S; Guise, Jeanne-Marie.

In: Birth, Vol. 31, No. 4, 12.2004, p. 280-284.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ghetti, Chiara ; Chan, Benjamin K S ; Guise, Jeanne-Marie. / Physicians' responses to patient-requested cesarean delivery. In: Birth. 2004 ; Vol. 31, No. 4. pp. 280-284.
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