Physician order entry in U.S. hospitals.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Determine the percent of U.S. hospitals where computerized physician order entry (POE) is available and the extent of its use. METHODS: A survey was sent to a systematic sample of 1,000 U.S. hospitals asking about availability of POE, whether usage is required, percent of physicians using it, and percent of orders entered by computer. RESULTS: About 66% do not have POE available. Of the 32.1% that have it completely or partially available, 4.9% require its usage, over half report usage by under 10% of physicians, and over half report that fewer than 10% of orders are entered this way. Analysis of comments showed that many hospitals have POE available for use by non-physicians only, but that they hope to offer it to physicians after careful planning. CONCLUSION: Most U.S. hospitals have not yet implemented POE. Complete availability throughout the hospital is rare, very few require its use, low percentages of physicians are actual users, and low percentages of orders are entered this way. On a national basis, computerized order entry by physicians is not yet widespread.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)235-239
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings / AMIA ... Annual Symposium. AMIA Symposium
StatePublished - 1998

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title = "Physician order entry in U.S. hospitals.",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Determine the percent of U.S. hospitals where computerized physician order entry (POE) is available and the extent of its use. METHODS: A survey was sent to a systematic sample of 1,000 U.S. hospitals asking about availability of POE, whether usage is required, percent of physicians using it, and percent of orders entered by computer. RESULTS: About 66{\%} do not have POE available. Of the 32.1{\%} that have it completely or partially available, 4.9{\%} require its usage, over half report usage by under 10{\%} of physicians, and over half report that fewer than 10{\%} of orders are entered this way. Analysis of comments showed that many hospitals have POE available for use by non-physicians only, but that they hope to offer it to physicians after careful planning. CONCLUSION: Most U.S. hospitals have not yet implemented POE. Complete availability throughout the hospital is rare, very few require its use, low percentages of physicians are actual users, and low percentages of orders are entered this way. On a national basis, computerized order entry by physicians is not yet widespread.",
author = "Joan Ash and Paul Gorman and Hersh, {William (Bill)}",
year = "1998",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "235--239",
journal = "Proceedings / AMIA . Annual Symposium. AMIA Symposium",
issn = "1531-605X",
publisher = "Hanley & Belfus",

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T1 - Physician order entry in U.S. hospitals.

AU - Ash, Joan

AU - Gorman, Paul

AU - Hersh, William (Bill)

PY - 1998

Y1 - 1998

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Determine the percent of U.S. hospitals where computerized physician order entry (POE) is available and the extent of its use. METHODS: A survey was sent to a systematic sample of 1,000 U.S. hospitals asking about availability of POE, whether usage is required, percent of physicians using it, and percent of orders entered by computer. RESULTS: About 66% do not have POE available. Of the 32.1% that have it completely or partially available, 4.9% require its usage, over half report usage by under 10% of physicians, and over half report that fewer than 10% of orders are entered this way. Analysis of comments showed that many hospitals have POE available for use by non-physicians only, but that they hope to offer it to physicians after careful planning. CONCLUSION: Most U.S. hospitals have not yet implemented POE. Complete availability throughout the hospital is rare, very few require its use, low percentages of physicians are actual users, and low percentages of orders are entered this way. On a national basis, computerized order entry by physicians is not yet widespread.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Determine the percent of U.S. hospitals where computerized physician order entry (POE) is available and the extent of its use. METHODS: A survey was sent to a systematic sample of 1,000 U.S. hospitals asking about availability of POE, whether usage is required, percent of physicians using it, and percent of orders entered by computer. RESULTS: About 66% do not have POE available. Of the 32.1% that have it completely or partially available, 4.9% require its usage, over half report usage by under 10% of physicians, and over half report that fewer than 10% of orders are entered this way. Analysis of comments showed that many hospitals have POE available for use by non-physicians only, but that they hope to offer it to physicians after careful planning. CONCLUSION: Most U.S. hospitals have not yet implemented POE. Complete availability throughout the hospital is rare, very few require its use, low percentages of physicians are actual users, and low percentages of orders are entered this way. On a national basis, computerized order entry by physicians is not yet widespread.

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