Physician office visits for low back pain: Frequency, clinical evaluation, and treatment patterns from a u.s. national survey

L. Gary Hart, Richard (Rick) Deyo, Daniel C. Cherkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

670 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Design This study is an analysis of national survey data from 5 sample years. Objectives. The author characterized the frequency of office visits for low back pain, the content of ambulatory care and how these vary by physician specialty. Summary of Background Data Few recent data are available regarding ambulatory care for low back pain or how case mix and patient management vary by physician specially. Methods. Data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey were grouped into three time periods (1980-81, 1985, 1989-90). Frequency of visits for low back pain, referral status, tests, and treatments were tabulated by physician specialty. Results. There were almost 15 million office visits for “mechanical” low back pain in 1990, ranking this problem fifth as a reason- for all physician visits Low back pain accounted for 2.8 percent of office visits in all three time periods. Nonspecific diagnostic labels were most common, and 56 percent of visits were to primary care physicians. Specialty variations were observed in caseload, diagnostic micx, and management. Conclusions. Back pain remains a major reason for all physician office visits. This study describes visit, referral, and management patterns among specialties providing the most care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-19
Number of pages9
JournalSpine
Volume20
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Office Visits
Physicians' Offices
Low Back Pain
Physicians
Ambulatory Care
Referral and Consultation
Health Care Surveys
Therapeutics
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Primary Care Physicians
Back Pain
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Ambulatory care
  • Low back pain
  • Office practice
  • Specialty differences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physiology

Cite this

Physician office visits for low back pain : Frequency, clinical evaluation, and treatment patterns from a u.s. national survey. / Gary Hart, L.; Deyo, Richard (Rick); Cherkin, Daniel C.

In: Spine, Vol. 20, No. 1, 1995, p. 11-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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