Physical activity and growth of Kenyan school children with hookworm, Trichuris trichiura and Ascaris lumbricoides infections are improved after treatment with albendazole

Elizabeth Adams, L. S. Stephenson, M. C. Latham, S. N. Kinoti

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Abstract

Growth, activity, appetite and intestinal helminth infections were compared for 55 Kenyan primary school children with hookworm (93% prevalence), T. trichiura (84% prevalence) and A. lumbricoides (29% prevalence) before and 9 wk after treatment with three 400-mg doses of albendazole (Zentel) or placebo. Fecal samples were examined for helminth eggs using a modified Kato technique. Activity was measured during free-play with motion recorders on the dominant thigh. Children rated their appetites on a 5-point scale. After baseline measurements, children were randomly allocated to the albendazole-treated (n = 28) and placebo (n = 27) groups, treated, and re-examined 9 wk later. At follow-up, egg counts were significantly lower than at baseline in the albendazole-treated group (P ≤ 0.002), and gains in activity, reported appetite and most indices of growth were significantly greater for the albendazole-treated group than for the placebo group. We conclude that treatment of undernourished school children for intestinal helminth infections with albendazole may improve growth and appetite and increase spontaneous physical activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1199-1206
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume124
Issue number8
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Trichuris trichiura
Ascaris lumbricoides
Trichuris
Ancylostomatoidea
hookworms
Albendazole
albendazole
school children
physical activity
appetite
Appetite
Exercise
Helminths
placebos
helminthiasis
Growth
Infection
infection
Placebos
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

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Physical activity and growth of Kenyan school children with hookworm, Trichuris trichiura and Ascaris lumbricoides infections are improved after treatment with albendazole. / Adams, Elizabeth; Stephenson, L. S.; Latham, M. C.; Kinoti, S. N.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 124, No. 8, 1994, p. 1199-1206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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