Photic resetting of the human circadian pacemaker in the absence of conscious vision

E. B. Klerman, T. L. Shanahan, D. J. Brotman, D. W. Rimmer, Jonathan Emens, J. F. Rizzo, C. A. Czeisler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

102 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ocular light exposure patterns are the primary stimuli for entraining the human circadian system to the local 24-h day. Many totally blind persons cannot use these stimuli and, therefore, have circadian rhythms that are not entrained. However, a few otherwise totally blind persons retain the ability to suppress plasma melatonin concentrations after ocular light exposure, probably using a neural pathway that includes the site of the human circadian pacemaker, suggesting that light information is reaching this site. To test definitively whether ocular light exposure could affect the circadian pacemaker of some blind persons and whether melatonin suppression in response to bright light correlates with light-induced phase shifts of the circadian system, the authors performed experiments with 5 totally blind volunteers using a protocol known to induce phase shifts of the circadian pacemaker in sighted individuals. In the 2 blind individuals who maintained light-induced melatonin suppression, the circadian system was shifted by appropriately timed bright-light stimuli. These data demonstrate that light can affect the circadian pacemaker of some totally blind individuals - either by altering the phase of the circadian pacemaker or by affecting its amplitude. They are consistent with data from animal studies demonstrating that there are different neural pathways and retinal cells that relay photic information to the brain: one for conscious light perception and the other for non-image-forming functions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)548-555
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of biological rhythms
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Light
Visually Impaired Persons
Melatonin
Neural Pathways
Aptitude
Circadian Rhythm
Volunteers
Brain

Keywords

  • Blind
  • Circadian
  • Human
  • Melatonin
  • Phase shift
  • Photic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Klerman, E. B., Shanahan, T. L., Brotman, D. J., Rimmer, D. W., Emens, J., Rizzo, J. F., & Czeisler, C. A. (2002). Photic resetting of the human circadian pacemaker in the absence of conscious vision. Journal of biological rhythms, 17(6), 548-555. https://doi.org/10.1177/0748730402238237

Photic resetting of the human circadian pacemaker in the absence of conscious vision. / Klerman, E. B.; Shanahan, T. L.; Brotman, D. J.; Rimmer, D. W.; Emens, Jonathan; Rizzo, J. F.; Czeisler, C. A.

In: Journal of biological rhythms, Vol. 17, No. 6, 01.12.2002, p. 548-555.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klerman, EB, Shanahan, TL, Brotman, DJ, Rimmer, DW, Emens, J, Rizzo, JF & Czeisler, CA 2002, 'Photic resetting of the human circadian pacemaker in the absence of conscious vision', Journal of biological rhythms, vol. 17, no. 6, pp. 548-555. https://doi.org/10.1177/0748730402238237
Klerman, E. B. ; Shanahan, T. L. ; Brotman, D. J. ; Rimmer, D. W. ; Emens, Jonathan ; Rizzo, J. F. ; Czeisler, C. A. / Photic resetting of the human circadian pacemaker in the absence of conscious vision. In: Journal of biological rhythms. 2002 ; Vol. 17, No. 6. pp. 548-555.
@article{1184ff2962c84d2a9b5a3d0edd9e4b1c,
title = "Photic resetting of the human circadian pacemaker in the absence of conscious vision",
abstract = "Ocular light exposure patterns are the primary stimuli for entraining the human circadian system to the local 24-h day. Many totally blind persons cannot use these stimuli and, therefore, have circadian rhythms that are not entrained. However, a few otherwise totally blind persons retain the ability to suppress plasma melatonin concentrations after ocular light exposure, probably using a neural pathway that includes the site of the human circadian pacemaker, suggesting that light information is reaching this site. To test definitively whether ocular light exposure could affect the circadian pacemaker of some blind persons and whether melatonin suppression in response to bright light correlates with light-induced phase shifts of the circadian system, the authors performed experiments with 5 totally blind volunteers using a protocol known to induce phase shifts of the circadian pacemaker in sighted individuals. In the 2 blind individuals who maintained light-induced melatonin suppression, the circadian system was shifted by appropriately timed bright-light stimuli. These data demonstrate that light can affect the circadian pacemaker of some totally blind individuals - either by altering the phase of the circadian pacemaker or by affecting its amplitude. They are consistent with data from animal studies demonstrating that there are different neural pathways and retinal cells that relay photic information to the brain: one for conscious light perception and the other for non-image-forming functions.",
keywords = "Blind, Circadian, Human, Melatonin, Phase shift, Photic",
author = "Klerman, {E. B.} and Shanahan, {T. L.} and Brotman, {D. J.} and Rimmer, {D. W.} and Jonathan Emens and Rizzo, {J. F.} and Czeisler, {C. A.}",
year = "2002",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0748730402238237",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "548--555",
journal = "Journal of Biological Rhythms",
issn = "0748-7304",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Photic resetting of the human circadian pacemaker in the absence of conscious vision

AU - Klerman, E. B.

AU - Shanahan, T. L.

AU - Brotman, D. J.

AU - Rimmer, D. W.

AU - Emens, Jonathan

AU - Rizzo, J. F.

AU - Czeisler, C. A.

PY - 2002/12/1

Y1 - 2002/12/1

N2 - Ocular light exposure patterns are the primary stimuli for entraining the human circadian system to the local 24-h day. Many totally blind persons cannot use these stimuli and, therefore, have circadian rhythms that are not entrained. However, a few otherwise totally blind persons retain the ability to suppress plasma melatonin concentrations after ocular light exposure, probably using a neural pathway that includes the site of the human circadian pacemaker, suggesting that light information is reaching this site. To test definitively whether ocular light exposure could affect the circadian pacemaker of some blind persons and whether melatonin suppression in response to bright light correlates with light-induced phase shifts of the circadian system, the authors performed experiments with 5 totally blind volunteers using a protocol known to induce phase shifts of the circadian pacemaker in sighted individuals. In the 2 blind individuals who maintained light-induced melatonin suppression, the circadian system was shifted by appropriately timed bright-light stimuli. These data demonstrate that light can affect the circadian pacemaker of some totally blind individuals - either by altering the phase of the circadian pacemaker or by affecting its amplitude. They are consistent with data from animal studies demonstrating that there are different neural pathways and retinal cells that relay photic information to the brain: one for conscious light perception and the other for non-image-forming functions.

AB - Ocular light exposure patterns are the primary stimuli for entraining the human circadian system to the local 24-h day. Many totally blind persons cannot use these stimuli and, therefore, have circadian rhythms that are not entrained. However, a few otherwise totally blind persons retain the ability to suppress plasma melatonin concentrations after ocular light exposure, probably using a neural pathway that includes the site of the human circadian pacemaker, suggesting that light information is reaching this site. To test definitively whether ocular light exposure could affect the circadian pacemaker of some blind persons and whether melatonin suppression in response to bright light correlates with light-induced phase shifts of the circadian system, the authors performed experiments with 5 totally blind volunteers using a protocol known to induce phase shifts of the circadian pacemaker in sighted individuals. In the 2 blind individuals who maintained light-induced melatonin suppression, the circadian system was shifted by appropriately timed bright-light stimuli. These data demonstrate that light can affect the circadian pacemaker of some totally blind individuals - either by altering the phase of the circadian pacemaker or by affecting its amplitude. They are consistent with data from animal studies demonstrating that there are different neural pathways and retinal cells that relay photic information to the brain: one for conscious light perception and the other for non-image-forming functions.

KW - Blind

KW - Circadian

KW - Human

KW - Melatonin

KW - Phase shift

KW - Photic

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037656048&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037656048&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0748730402238237

DO - 10.1177/0748730402238237

M3 - Article

C2 - 12465888

AN - SCOPUS:0037656048

VL - 17

SP - 548

EP - 555

JO - Journal of Biological Rhythms

JF - Journal of Biological Rhythms

SN - 0748-7304

IS - 6

ER -