Pharmacological targeting of coagulation factor XI mitigates the development of experimental atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice

Anh T.P. Ngo, Kelley R. Jordan, Paul A. Mueller, Matthew W. Hagen, Stéphanie E. Reitsma, Cristina Puy, Alexey S. Revenko, Christina U. Lorentz, Erik I. Tucker, Quifang Cheng, Monica T. Hinds, Sergio Fazio, Brett P. Monia, David Gailani, András Gruber, Hagai Tavori, Owen J.T. McCarty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Human coagulation factor (F) XI deficiency, a defect of the contact activation system, protects against venous thrombosis, stroke, and heart attack, whereas FXII, plasma prekallikrein, or kininogen deficiencies are asymptomatic. FXI deficiency, inhibition of FXI production, activated FXI (FXIa) inhibitors, and antibodies to FXI that interfere with FXI/FXII interactions reduce experimental thrombosis and inflammation. FXI inhibitors are antithrombotic in patients, and FXI and FXII deficiencies are atheroprotective in apolipoprotein E–deficient mice. Objectives: Investigate the effects of pharmacological targeting of FXI in experimental models of atherogenesis and established atherosclerosis. Methods and Results: Low-density lipoprotein receptor-knockout (Ldlr−/−) mice were administered high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks; concomitantly, FXI was targeted with anti-FXI antibody (14E11) or FXI antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). 14E11 and FXI-ASO reduced atherosclerotic lesion area in proximal aortas when compared with controls, and 14E11 also reduced aortic sinus lesions. In an established disease model, in which therapy was given after atherosclerosis had developed, Ldlr−/− mice were fed HFD for 8 weeks and then administered 14E11 or FXI-ASO weekly until 16 weeks on HFD. In this established disease model, 14E11 and FXI-ASO reduced atherosclerotic lesion area in proximal aortas, but not in aortic sinus. In cultures of human endothelium, FXIa exposure disrupted VE-Cadherin expression and increased endothelial lipoprotein permeability. Strikingly, we found that 14E11 prevented the disruption of VE-Cadherin expression in aortic sinus lesions observed in the atherogenesis mouse model. Conclusion: Pharmacological targeting of FXI reduced atherogenesis in Ldlr−/− mice. Interference with the contact activation system may safely reduce development or progression of atherosclerosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1001-1017
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021

Keywords

  • atherosclerosis
  • contact activation
  • factor XI
  • obesity
  • vascular permeability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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