Pharmacologic inhibition of L-tyrosine degradation ameliorates cerebral dopamine deficiency in murine phenylketonuria (PKU)

Cary Harding, Shelley R. Winn, K. Michael Gibson, Erland Arning, Teodoro Bottiglieri, Markus Grompe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Monoamine neurotransmitter deficiency has been implicated in the etiology of neuropsychiatric symptoms associated with chronic hyperphenylalaninemia in phenylketonuria (PKU). Two proposed explanations for neurotransmitter deficiency in PKU include first, that chronically elevated blood L-phenylalanine (Phe) inhibits the transport of L-tyrosine (Tyr) and L-tryptophan (Trp), the substrates for dopamine and serotonin synthesis respectively, into brain. In the second hypothesis, elevated Phe competitively inhibits brain tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) activities, the rate limiting steps in dopamine and serotonin synthesis. Dietary supplementation with large neutral amino acids (LNAA) including Tyr and Trp has been recommended for individuals with chronically elevated blood Phe in an attempt to restore amino acid and monoamine homeostasis in brain. As a potential alternative treatment approach, we demonstrate that pharmacologic inhibition of Tyr degradation through oral administration of nitisinone (NTBC) yielded sustained increases in blood and brain Tyr, decreased blood and brain Phe, and consequently increased dopamine synthesis in a murine model of PKU. Our results suggest that Phe-mediated inhibition of TH activity is the likely mechanism of impaired dopamine synthesis in PKU. Pharmacologic inhibition of Tyr degradation may be a promising adjunct therapy for CNS monoamine neurotransmitter deficiency in hyperphenylalaninemic individuals with PKU.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)735-743
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Inherited Metabolic Disease
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2014

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Phenylketonurias
Tyrosine
Dopamine
Brain
Neurotransmitter Agents
Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase
Tryptophan
Serotonin
Tryptophan Hydroxylase
Neutral Amino Acids
Dietary Supplements
Phenylalanine
Oral Administration
Homeostasis
Amino Acids
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Pharmacologic inhibition of L-tyrosine degradation ameliorates cerebral dopamine deficiency in murine phenylketonuria (PKU). / Harding, Cary; Winn, Shelley R.; Gibson, K. Michael; Arning, Erland; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Grompe, Markus.

In: Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease, Vol. 37, No. 5, 01.09.2014, p. 735-743.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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