Persistent school dysfunction: Unrecognized comorbidity and suboptimal therapy

David Kube, Bruce K. Shapiro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine reasons for continued school dysfunction in children previously diagnosed as having attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or enrolled in a special education program (spec. ed.), a retrospective chart review of patients referred for interdisciplinary evaluations at a tertiary center for hyperactivity and learning problems was completed. Interdisciplinary clinical recommendations were used to define reasons for treatment failure in 116 children with a prior diagnosis of ADHD or spec. ed. placement. Results showed 45% of children enrolled in spec. ed. had previously undiagnosed ADHD. Thirty-one percent of those with ADHD, 55% of those in spec. ed., and 55% of those diagnosed with ADHD and in spec. ed. (Both) received a new educationally handicapping diagnosis. Psychiatric comorbidity was present in 28% of those with ADHD, 18% of those in spec. ed., and 23% of Both subjects. Thirteen percent of those in spec. ed. lead significant coexisting medical conditions. Special education services were insufficient in 55% of children in spec. ed. and 55% of Both subjects. A significant difference (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)571-576
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume35
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Comorbidity
Special Education
Therapeutics
Treatment Failure
Psychiatry
Learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Persistent school dysfunction : Unrecognized comorbidity and suboptimal therapy. / Kube, David; Shapiro, Bruce K.

In: Clinical Pediatrics, Vol. 35, No. 11, 11.1996, p. 571-576.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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