Persistence of Staphylococcus aureus colonization among individuals with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases treated with TNF-α inhibitor therapy

Cara D. Varley, Atulya (Atul) Deodhar, Benjamin (Ben) Ehst, Antony Bakke, Andrew Blauvelt, Robert Vega, Shellie Yamashita, Kevin Winthrop

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. We investigated the relationship between Staphylococcus aureus colonization and the use of immunosuppressive therapies in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs).Methods. We prospectively enrolled IMID patients from the rheumatology and dermatology departments of Oregon Health & Science University. At enrolment, we surveyed patients for S. aureus infection risk factors and those using immune-modulating therapies, and evaluated their colonization status with bilateral nares and inguinal fold cultures. Patients were asked to follow up 6-12 months later for reassessment of colonization status by repeat culture. S. aureus isolates were tested for the presence of methicillin resistance by PCR.Results. We enrolled a total of 548 IMID patients. At enrolment, 219 (40.0%) patients were colonized with S. aureus, of which 27 (12.3%) were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Baseline colonization rates were similar between TNF-α inhibitor users and non-users (40.5% and 39.4%, P = 0.79), but were significantly higher for psoriasis patients compared with those with RA (43.5% and 31.8%, P = 0.02). A total of 384 patients were available for follow-up. Patients who were colonized at enrolment were more likely to be colonized at follow-up if they were treated with TNF-α inhibitors during the study as compared to patients without TNF-α inhibitor exposure [odds ratio (OR) = 2.2 (95% CI 1.1, 4.2), P = 0.02].Conclusion. Patients with psoriasis are more likely to be colonized with S. aureus than patients with RA. Patients who are colonized with S. aureus are more likely to remain colonized if exposed to TNF-α inhibitors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberket351
Pages (from-to)332-337
Number of pages6
JournalRheumatology (United Kingdom)
Volume53
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

Fingerprint

Staphylococcus aureus
Therapeutics
Psoriasis
Methicillin Resistance
Groin
Rheumatology
Immunosuppressive Agents
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Dermatology
Odds Ratio
Polymerase Chain Reaction

Keywords

  • Biologic therapy
  • Psoriasis
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Staphylococcus aureus
  • Tumour necrosis factor-alpha

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Persistence of Staphylococcus aureus colonization among individuals with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases treated with TNF-α inhibitor therapy. / Varley, Cara D.; Deodhar, Atulya (Atul); Ehst, Benjamin (Ben); Bakke, Antony; Blauvelt, Andrew; Vega, Robert; Yamashita, Shellie; Winthrop, Kevin.

In: Rheumatology (United Kingdom), Vol. 53, No. 2, ket351, 02.2014, p. 332-337.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Varley, Cara D. ; Deodhar, Atulya (Atul) ; Ehst, Benjamin (Ben) ; Bakke, Antony ; Blauvelt, Andrew ; Vega, Robert ; Yamashita, Shellie ; Winthrop, Kevin. / Persistence of Staphylococcus aureus colonization among individuals with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases treated with TNF-α inhibitor therapy. In: Rheumatology (United Kingdom). 2014 ; Vol. 53, No. 2. pp. 332-337.
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abstract = "Objective. We investigated the relationship between Staphylococcus aureus colonization and the use of immunosuppressive therapies in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs).Methods. We prospectively enrolled IMID patients from the rheumatology and dermatology departments of Oregon Health & Science University. At enrolment, we surveyed patients for S. aureus infection risk factors and those using immune-modulating therapies, and evaluated their colonization status with bilateral nares and inguinal fold cultures. Patients were asked to follow up 6-12 months later for reassessment of colonization status by repeat culture. S. aureus isolates were tested for the presence of methicillin resistance by PCR.Results. We enrolled a total of 548 IMID patients. At enrolment, 219 (40.0{\%}) patients were colonized with S. aureus, of which 27 (12.3{\%}) were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Baseline colonization rates were similar between TNF-α inhibitor users and non-users (40.5{\%} and 39.4{\%}, P = 0.79), but were significantly higher for psoriasis patients compared with those with RA (43.5{\%} and 31.8{\%}, P = 0.02). A total of 384 patients were available for follow-up. Patients who were colonized at enrolment were more likely to be colonized at follow-up if they were treated with TNF-α inhibitors during the study as compared to patients without TNF-α inhibitor exposure [odds ratio (OR) = 2.2 (95{\%} CI 1.1, 4.2), P = 0.02].Conclusion. Patients with psoriasis are more likely to be colonized with S. aureus than patients with RA. Patients who are colonized with S. aureus are more likely to remain colonized if exposed to TNF-α inhibitors.",
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AU - Varley, Cara D.

AU - Deodhar, Atulya (Atul)

AU - Ehst, Benjamin (Ben)

AU - Bakke, Antony

AU - Blauvelt, Andrew

AU - Vega, Robert

AU - Yamashita, Shellie

AU - Winthrop, Kevin

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N2 - Objective. We investigated the relationship between Staphylococcus aureus colonization and the use of immunosuppressive therapies in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs).Methods. We prospectively enrolled IMID patients from the rheumatology and dermatology departments of Oregon Health & Science University. At enrolment, we surveyed patients for S. aureus infection risk factors and those using immune-modulating therapies, and evaluated their colonization status with bilateral nares and inguinal fold cultures. Patients were asked to follow up 6-12 months later for reassessment of colonization status by repeat culture. S. aureus isolates were tested for the presence of methicillin resistance by PCR.Results. We enrolled a total of 548 IMID patients. At enrolment, 219 (40.0%) patients were colonized with S. aureus, of which 27 (12.3%) were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Baseline colonization rates were similar between TNF-α inhibitor users and non-users (40.5% and 39.4%, P = 0.79), but were significantly higher for psoriasis patients compared with those with RA (43.5% and 31.8%, P = 0.02). A total of 384 patients were available for follow-up. Patients who were colonized at enrolment were more likely to be colonized at follow-up if they were treated with TNF-α inhibitors during the study as compared to patients without TNF-α inhibitor exposure [odds ratio (OR) = 2.2 (95% CI 1.1, 4.2), P = 0.02].Conclusion. Patients with psoriasis are more likely to be colonized with S. aureus than patients with RA. Patients who are colonized with S. aureus are more likely to remain colonized if exposed to TNF-α inhibitors.

AB - Objective. We investigated the relationship between Staphylococcus aureus colonization and the use of immunosuppressive therapies in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs).Methods. We prospectively enrolled IMID patients from the rheumatology and dermatology departments of Oregon Health & Science University. At enrolment, we surveyed patients for S. aureus infection risk factors and those using immune-modulating therapies, and evaluated their colonization status with bilateral nares and inguinal fold cultures. Patients were asked to follow up 6-12 months later for reassessment of colonization status by repeat culture. S. aureus isolates were tested for the presence of methicillin resistance by PCR.Results. We enrolled a total of 548 IMID patients. At enrolment, 219 (40.0%) patients were colonized with S. aureus, of which 27 (12.3%) were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Baseline colonization rates were similar between TNF-α inhibitor users and non-users (40.5% and 39.4%, P = 0.79), but were significantly higher for psoriasis patients compared with those with RA (43.5% and 31.8%, P = 0.02). A total of 384 patients were available for follow-up. Patients who were colonized at enrolment were more likely to be colonized at follow-up if they were treated with TNF-α inhibitors during the study as compared to patients without TNF-α inhibitor exposure [odds ratio (OR) = 2.2 (95% CI 1.1, 4.2), P = 0.02].Conclusion. Patients with psoriasis are more likely to be colonized with S. aureus than patients with RA. Patients who are colonized with S. aureus are more likely to remain colonized if exposed to TNF-α inhibitors.

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KW - Rheumatoid arthritis

KW - Staphylococcus aureus

KW - Tumour necrosis factor-alpha

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