Perioperative oxygen supplementation and surgical site infection after cesarean delivery

A randomized trial

Neena Duggal, Vineela Poddatorri, Sara Noroozkhani, R. Iram Siddik-Ahmad, Aaron Caughey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:: To evaluate whether supplemental perioperative oxygen decreases surgical site wound infections or endometritis. STUDY DESIGN:: This was a prospective, randomized trial. Patients who were to undergo cesarean delivery were recruited and randomly allocated to either 30% or 80% oxygen during the cesarean delivery and for 1 hour after surgery. The obstetricians and patients were blinded to the concentration of oxygen used. Patients were evaluated for wound infection or endometritis during their hospital stay and by 6 weeks postpartum. The primary end point was a composite of either surgical site infection or endometritis. RESULTS:: Eight hundred thirty-one patients were recruited. Of these, 415 participants received 30% oxygen perioperatively and 416 received 80% oxygen. The groups were well matched for age, race, parity, diabetes, number of previous cesarean deliveries, and scheduled compared with unscheduled cesarean deliveries. An intention-to-treat analysis was used. There was no difference in the primary composite outcome (8.2% in women who received 30% oxygen compared with 8.2% in women who received 80% oxygen, P=.89), no difference in surgical site infection in the two groups (5.5% compared with 5.8%, P=.98), and no significant difference in endometritis in the two groups (2.7% compared with 2.4%, P=.66), respectively. CONCLUSION:: Women who received 80% supplemental oxygen perioperatively did not have a lower rate of a surgical site infection or endometritis as compared with women who received 30% supplemental oxygen concentration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-84
Number of pages6
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume122
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

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Surgical Wound Infection
Endometritis
Oxygen
Intention to Treat Analysis
Wound Infection
Parity
Postpartum Period
Length of Stay

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Perioperative oxygen supplementation and surgical site infection after cesarean delivery : A randomized trial. / Duggal, Neena; Poddatorri, Vineela; Noroozkhani, Sara; Siddik-Ahmad, R. Iram; Caughey, Aaron.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 122, No. 1, 07.2013, p. 79-84.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Duggal, Neena ; Poddatorri, Vineela ; Noroozkhani, Sara ; Siddik-Ahmad, R. Iram ; Caughey, Aaron. / Perioperative oxygen supplementation and surgical site infection after cesarean delivery : A randomized trial. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2013 ; Vol. 122, No. 1. pp. 79-84.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE:: To evaluate whether supplemental perioperative oxygen decreases surgical site wound infections or endometritis. STUDY DESIGN:: This was a prospective, randomized trial. Patients who were to undergo cesarean delivery were recruited and randomly allocated to either 30{\%} or 80{\%} oxygen during the cesarean delivery and for 1 hour after surgery. The obstetricians and patients were blinded to the concentration of oxygen used. Patients were evaluated for wound infection or endometritis during their hospital stay and by 6 weeks postpartum. The primary end point was a composite of either surgical site infection or endometritis. RESULTS:: Eight hundred thirty-one patients were recruited. Of these, 415 participants received 30{\%} oxygen perioperatively and 416 received 80{\%} oxygen. The groups were well matched for age, race, parity, diabetes, number of previous cesarean deliveries, and scheduled compared with unscheduled cesarean deliveries. An intention-to-treat analysis was used. There was no difference in the primary composite outcome (8.2{\%} in women who received 30{\%} oxygen compared with 8.2{\%} in women who received 80{\%} oxygen, P=.89), no difference in surgical site infection in the two groups (5.5{\%} compared with 5.8{\%}, P=.98), and no significant difference in endometritis in the two groups (2.7{\%} compared with 2.4{\%}, P=.66), respectively. CONCLUSION:: Women who received 80{\%} supplemental oxygen perioperatively did not have a lower rate of a surgical site infection or endometritis as compared with women who received 30{\%} supplemental oxygen concentration.",
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