Performance improvement and patient safety program (PIPS) guided quality improvement initiatives can significantly reduce CT imaging in pediatric trauma patients

Christopher R. Connelly, John D. Yonge, Lynn E. Eastes, Pamela E. Bilyeu, Phillip M. Kemp Bohan, Martin A. Schreiber, Kenneth S. Azarow, Jennifer M. Watters, Mubeen A. Jafri

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

  • 1 Citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Morbidity and mortality of cervical spine (C-Spine) injury in pediatric trauma patients is high, necessitating quick and accurate diagnosis. Best practices emphasize minimizing radiation exposure through decreased reliance on computed tomography (CT), instead using clinical assessment, physical examination and alternate imaging techniques. We implemented an institutional performance improvement and patient safety program (PIPS) initiative for C-Spine clearance in 2010 due to high rates of CT scans among pediatric trauma patients. METHODS: A retrospective review of pediatric trauma patients, ages 0–14, in the pre- and post-PIPS implementation periods was conducted. Rates of C-Spine CT, overall CT, other imaging modalities, radiation exposure, patient characteristics and injury severity were compared, and compliance with PIPS protocol was reviewed. RESULTS: Patient characteristics and injury severity were similar pre- and post-PIPS implementation. C-Spine CT rates decreased significantly between groups (30% v 13%, p

LanguageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 30 2016

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Patient Safety
Quality Improvement
Tomography
Pediatrics
Wounds and Injuries
Spine
Radiation Exposure
Practice Guidelines
Physical Examination
Morbidity
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

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title = "Performance improvement and patient safety program (PIPS) guided quality improvement initiatives can significantly reduce CT imaging in pediatric trauma patients",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Morbidity and mortality of cervical spine (C-Spine) injury in pediatric trauma patients is high, necessitating quick and accurate diagnosis. Best practices emphasize minimizing radiation exposure through decreased reliance on computed tomography (CT), instead using clinical assessment, physical examination and alternate imaging techniques. We implemented an institutional performance improvement and patient safety program (PIPS) initiative for C-Spine clearance in 2010 due to high rates of CT scans among pediatric trauma patients. METHODS: A retrospective review of pediatric trauma patients, ages 0–14, in the pre- and post-PIPS implementation periods was conducted. Rates of C-Spine CT, overall CT, other imaging modalities, radiation exposure, patient characteristics and injury severity were compared, and compliance with PIPS protocol was reviewed. RESULTS: Patient characteristics and injury severity were similar pre- and post-PIPS implementation. C-Spine CT rates decreased significantly between groups (30% v 13%, p",
author = "Connelly, {Christopher R.} and Yonge, {John D.} and Eastes, {Lynn E.} and Bilyeu, {Pamela E.} and {Kemp Bohan}, {Phillip M.} and Schreiber, {Martin A.} and Azarow, {Kenneth S.} and Watters, {Jennifer M.} and Jafri, {Mubeen A.}",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1097/TA.0000000000001071",
journal = "Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery",
issn = "2163-0755",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",

}

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T1 - Performance improvement and patient safety program (PIPS) guided quality improvement initiatives can significantly reduce CT imaging in pediatric trauma patients

AU - Connelly,Christopher R.

AU - Yonge,John D.

AU - Eastes,Lynn E.

AU - Bilyeu,Pamela E.

AU - Kemp Bohan,Phillip M.

AU - Schreiber,Martin A.

AU - Azarow,Kenneth S.

AU - Watters,Jennifer M.

AU - Jafri,Mubeen A.

PY - 2016/3/30

Y1 - 2016/3/30

N2 - BACKGROUND: Morbidity and mortality of cervical spine (C-Spine) injury in pediatric trauma patients is high, necessitating quick and accurate diagnosis. Best practices emphasize minimizing radiation exposure through decreased reliance on computed tomography (CT), instead using clinical assessment, physical examination and alternate imaging techniques. We implemented an institutional performance improvement and patient safety program (PIPS) initiative for C-Spine clearance in 2010 due to high rates of CT scans among pediatric trauma patients. METHODS: A retrospective review of pediatric trauma patients, ages 0–14, in the pre- and post-PIPS implementation periods was conducted. Rates of C-Spine CT, overall CT, other imaging modalities, radiation exposure, patient characteristics and injury severity were compared, and compliance with PIPS protocol was reviewed. RESULTS: Patient characteristics and injury severity were similar pre- and post-PIPS implementation. C-Spine CT rates decreased significantly between groups (30% v 13%, p

AB - BACKGROUND: Morbidity and mortality of cervical spine (C-Spine) injury in pediatric trauma patients is high, necessitating quick and accurate diagnosis. Best practices emphasize minimizing radiation exposure through decreased reliance on computed tomography (CT), instead using clinical assessment, physical examination and alternate imaging techniques. We implemented an institutional performance improvement and patient safety program (PIPS) initiative for C-Spine clearance in 2010 due to high rates of CT scans among pediatric trauma patients. METHODS: A retrospective review of pediatric trauma patients, ages 0–14, in the pre- and post-PIPS implementation periods was conducted. Rates of C-Spine CT, overall CT, other imaging modalities, radiation exposure, patient characteristics and injury severity were compared, and compliance with PIPS protocol was reviewed. RESULTS: Patient characteristics and injury severity were similar pre- and post-PIPS implementation. C-Spine CT rates decreased significantly between groups (30% v 13%, p

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