Perceptions of nonsurgical permanent contraception among potential users, providers, and influencers in Wardha district and New Delhi, India: Exploratory research

Jennifer C. Aengst, Elizabeth K. Harrington, Pramod Bahulekar, Poonam Shivkumar, Jeffrey Jensen, B. S. Garg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: New permanent contraceptive methods are in development, including nonsurgical permanent contraception (NSPC). OBJECTIVE: In the present study, perceptions of NSPC in India among married women, married men, mothers-in-law, providers, and health advocates in Eastern Maharashtra (Wardha district) and New Delhi were examined. METHODS: We conducted semi-structured interviews with 40 married women and 20 mothers-in-law; surveys with 150 married men; and focus group discussions with obstetrics/gynecology providers and advocates. Transcripts were coded and analyzed using a grounded theory approach, where emerging themes are analyzed during the data collection period. RESULTS: The majority of female respondents expressed support of permanent contraception and interest in NSPC, stating the importance of avoiding surgery and minimizing recovery time. They expressed concerns about safety and efficacy; many felt that a confirmation test would be necessary regardless of the failure rate. Most male respondents were supportive of female permanent contraception (PC) and preferred NSPC to a surgical method, as long as it was safe and effective. Providers were interested in NSPC yet had specific concerns about safety, efficacy, cost, uptake, and government pressure. They also had concerns that a nonsurgical approach could undermine the inherent seriousness of choosing PC. Advocates were interested in NSPC but had concerns about safety and potential misuse in the Indian context. CONCLUSION: Although perceptions of NSPC were varied, all study populations indicated interest in NSPC. Concerns about safety, efficacy, appropriate patient counseling, and ethics emerged from the present study and should be considered as NSPC methods continue to be developed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-8
Number of pages6
JournalIndian journal of public health
Volume61
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Contraception
India
Research
Safety
Mothers
Focus Groups
Gynecology
Ethics
Obstetrics
Counseling
Interviews
Pressure
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Perceptions of nonsurgical permanent contraception among potential users, providers, and influencers in Wardha district and New Delhi, India : Exploratory research. / Aengst, Jennifer C.; Harrington, Elizabeth K.; Bahulekar, Pramod; Shivkumar, Poonam; Jensen, Jeffrey; Garg, B. S.

In: Indian journal of public health, Vol. 61, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 3-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Aengst, Jennifer C. ; Harrington, Elizabeth K. ; Bahulekar, Pramod ; Shivkumar, Poonam ; Jensen, Jeffrey ; Garg, B. S. / Perceptions of nonsurgical permanent contraception among potential users, providers, and influencers in Wardha district and New Delhi, India : Exploratory research. In: Indian journal of public health. 2017 ; Vol. 61, No. 1. pp. 3-8.
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