Perceptions of house officers who use physician order entry.

Joan Ash, Paul Gorman, William (Bill) Hersh, M. Lavelle, S. B. Poulsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Describe the perceptions of housestaff physicians about their experience using computerized physician order entry (POE) in hospitals. METHODS: Qualitative study using data from participant observation, focus groups, and both formal and informal interviews. Data were analyzed by three researchers using a grounded approach to identify patterns and themes in the texts. RESULTS: Six themes were identified, including housestaff education, benefits of POE, problems with POE, feelings about POE, implementation strategies, and the future of POE. CONCLUSION: House officers felt that POE assists patient care but may undermine education. They found that POE works best when tailored to fit local and individual workflow. Implementation strategies should include mechanisms for engaging housestaff in the decision process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)471-475
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings / AMIA ... Annual Symposium. AMIA Symposium
StatePublished - 1999

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Physicians
Medical Order Entry Systems
Education
Workflow
Focus Groups
Patient Care
Emotions
Research Personnel
Observation
Interviews

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Perceptions of house officers who use physician order entry. / Ash, Joan; Gorman, Paul; Hersh, William (Bill); Lavelle, M.; Poulsen, S. B.

In: Proceedings / AMIA ... Annual Symposium. AMIA Symposium, 1999, p. 471-475.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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