Perceived Impact of the 80-Hour Workweek

Five Years Later1

Eric J. Dozois, Stefan D. Holubar, Vassiliki Tsikitis, Kishore Malireddy, Robert R. Cima, David R. Farley, David W. Larson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We aimed to assess perceptions of the effects of the 80-hour workweek (80hWW) restriction on patient care, education, and resident quality of life. Materials and Methods: In April 2007, attending surgeons and residents in nine surgical specialties at our institution were surveyed. Respondents were categorized into three groups: (1) attending surgeons; (2) residents beginning their training before the 80hWW implementation (ResBefore); and (3) residents beginning training after the 80hWW implementation (ResAfter). Differences between groups were assessed with univariate analysis. Results: The overall response rate was 57%. A minority in all three groups (≤33%) believed the 80hWW improved patient care. Fifteen percent of attending surgeons, 30% of ResBefore, and 67% of ResAfter believed patients were safer (P <0.001). Eighty-three percent of attending surgeons, 74% of ResBefore, and 41% of ResAfter (P <0.001) believed continuity of care was compromised. All groups (≥84%) agreed that midlevel providers were now critical to successfully deliver health care (P = 0.40). Fewer attending surgeons (21%) and ResBefore (29%) perceived improvements in education compared with ResAfter (68%; P 

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-15
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume156
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Patient Care
Surgical Specialties
Education
Continuity of Patient Care
Quality of Life
Surgeons
Delivery of Health Care
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • attending physician
  • education
  • patient care
  • quality of life
  • residency
  • surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Dozois, E. J., Holubar, S. D., Tsikitis, V., Malireddy, K., Cima, R. R., Farley, D. R., & Larson, D. W. (2009). Perceived Impact of the 80-Hour Workweek: Five Years Later1. Journal of Surgical Research, 156(1), 3-15. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2009.02.003

Perceived Impact of the 80-Hour Workweek : Five Years Later1. / Dozois, Eric J.; Holubar, Stefan D.; Tsikitis, Vassiliki; Malireddy, Kishore; Cima, Robert R.; Farley, David R.; Larson, David W.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 156, No. 1, 09.2009, p. 3-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dozois, EJ, Holubar, SD, Tsikitis, V, Malireddy, K, Cima, RR, Farley, DR & Larson, DW 2009, 'Perceived Impact of the 80-Hour Workweek: Five Years Later1', Journal of Surgical Research, vol. 156, no. 1, pp. 3-15. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2009.02.003
Dozois, Eric J. ; Holubar, Stefan D. ; Tsikitis, Vassiliki ; Malireddy, Kishore ; Cima, Robert R. ; Farley, David R. ; Larson, David W. / Perceived Impact of the 80-Hour Workweek : Five Years Later1. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 2009 ; Vol. 156, No. 1. pp. 3-15.
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