Perceived barriers, resources, and training needs of rural primary care providers relevant to the management of childhood obesity

Nancy Findholt, Melinda Davis, Yvonne L. Michael

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To explore the perceived barriers, resources, and training needs of rural primary care providers in relation to implementing the American Medical Association Expert Committee recommendations for assessment, treatment, and prevention of childhood obesity. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 rural primary care providers in Oregon. Transcribed interviews were thematically coded. Results: Barriers to addressing childhood obesity fell into 5 categories: barriers related to the practice (time constraints, lack of reimbursement, few opportunities to detect obesity), the clinician (limited knowledge), the family/patient (family lifestyle and lack of parent motivation to change, low family income and lack of health insurance, sensitivity of the issue), the community (lack of pediatric subspecialists and multidisciplinary/tertiary care services, few community resources), and the broader sociocultural environment (sociocultural influences, high prevalence of childhood obesity). There were very few clinic and community resources to assist clinicians in addressing weight issues. Clinicians had received little previous training relevant to childhood obesity, and they expressed an interest in several topics. Conclusions: Rural primary care providers face extensive barriers in relation to implementing recommended practices for assessment, treatment, and prevention of childhood obesity. Particularly problematic is the lack of local and regional resources. Employing nurses to provide case management and behavior counseling, group visits, and telehealth and other technological communications are strategies that could improve the management of childhood obesity in rural primary care settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Rural Health
Volume29
Issue numberSUPPL.1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Pediatric Obesity
Primary Health Care
Interviews
Telemedicine
Case Management
American Medical Association
Tertiary Healthcare
Health Insurance
Life Style
Motivation
Counseling
Obesity
Nurses
Communication
Pediatrics
Weights and Measures
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Childhood obesity
  • Primary care practice
  • Qualitative research
  • Rural

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Perceived barriers, resources, and training needs of rural primary care providers relevant to the management of childhood obesity. / Findholt, Nancy; Davis, Melinda; Michael, Yvonne L.

In: Journal of Rural Health, Vol. 29, No. SUPPL.1, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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