Peptide nanoparticle catalysis

Michael (Mike) Heller, Michelle Cheung, Tsukasa Takahashi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Improved catalysis for more efficient chemical processing, biomass conversions and water oxidation-hydrogen production will be important for achieving new clean technologies. Our research work involves a novel approach to produce catalytic mechanistic properties in synthetic peptide nanoparticle structures that mimic the active sites of enzymes. A series of six peptides have now been designed and synthesized which contain a cysteine sulfhydryal group (nucleophile) and histidine imidazole group (general base) in close proximity. Upon acylation of the cysteine sulfhydryal group, some of the peptides with closely proximated imidazole groups, exhibit accelerated deacylation in the presence of a trapping reagent. Peptides with phenylalanine groups between the cysteine and histidine have deacylation rates more than 10 times higher than in the peptides without a histidine. This accelerated deacylation indicates that the histidine imidazole group is functioning much like it does in the catalytic sites of the natural cysteine and serine proteases. These peptides will ultimately be attached to derivatized nanoparticles which are designed to bind appropriate substrates (esters and amides) through hydrophobic and/or electrostatic interactions. The final goal being to use the peptide nanoparticle structures to accelerate both the acylation and deacylation rates and produce true substrate turnover.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTechnical Proceedings of the 2012 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, NSTI-Nanotech 2012
Pages499-501
Number of pages3
StatePublished - Aug 20 2012
Externally publishedYes
EventNanotechnology 2012: Advanced Materials, CNTs, Particles, Films and Composites - 2012 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, NSTI-Nanotech 2012 - Santa Clara, CA, United States
Duration: Jun 18 2012Jun 21 2012

Publication series

NameTechnical Proceedings of the 2012 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, NSTI-Nanotech 2012

Conference

ConferenceNanotechnology 2012: Advanced Materials, CNTs, Particles, Films and Composites - 2012 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, NSTI-Nanotech 2012
CountryUnited States
CitySanta Clara, CA
Period6/18/126/21/12

Fingerprint

Peptides
Catalysis
Nanoparticles
Histidine
Cysteine
Acylation
Environmental technology
Nucleophiles
Cysteine Proteases
Serine Proteases
Substrates
Hydrogen production
Coulomb interactions
Phenylalanine
Amides
Esters
Biomass
Enzymes
Oxidation
Water

Keywords

  • Biomimetic
  • Catalysis
  • Nanocatalysis
  • Peptides
  • Synzymes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

Cite this

Heller, M. M., Cheung, M., & Takahashi, T. (2012). Peptide nanoparticle catalysis. In Technical Proceedings of the 2012 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, NSTI-Nanotech 2012 (pp. 499-501). (Technical Proceedings of the 2012 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, NSTI-Nanotech 2012).

Peptide nanoparticle catalysis. / Heller, Michael (Mike); Cheung, Michelle; Takahashi, Tsukasa.

Technical Proceedings of the 2012 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, NSTI-Nanotech 2012. 2012. p. 499-501 (Technical Proceedings of the 2012 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, NSTI-Nanotech 2012).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Heller, MM, Cheung, M & Takahashi, T 2012, Peptide nanoparticle catalysis. in Technical Proceedings of the 2012 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, NSTI-Nanotech 2012. Technical Proceedings of the 2012 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, NSTI-Nanotech 2012, pp. 499-501, Nanotechnology 2012: Advanced Materials, CNTs, Particles, Films and Composites - 2012 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, NSTI-Nanotech 2012, Santa Clara, CA, United States, 6/18/12.
Heller MM, Cheung M, Takahashi T. Peptide nanoparticle catalysis. In Technical Proceedings of the 2012 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, NSTI-Nanotech 2012. 2012. p. 499-501. (Technical Proceedings of the 2012 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, NSTI-Nanotech 2012).
Heller, Michael (Mike) ; Cheung, Michelle ; Takahashi, Tsukasa. / Peptide nanoparticle catalysis. Technical Proceedings of the 2012 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, NSTI-Nanotech 2012. 2012. pp. 499-501 (Technical Proceedings of the 2012 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, NSTI-Nanotech 2012).
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