Peer Associations and Coping: The Mediating Role of Ethnic Identity for Urban, African American Adolescents

Jeneka A. Joyce, Maya E. O'Neil, Elizabeth A. Stormshak, Ellen H. McWhirter, Thomas J. Dishion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study sought to examine the relationship between coping strategies and prosocial and deviant peer associations for urban, African American adolescents. In addition, the study analyzed the mediating role of ethnic identity for coping strategies and peer associations. Results of the African American models were then compared with models for European American adolescents. Results indicated that African American and European American adolescents who reported using distraction coping strategies were more likely to associate with prosocial peers, and those who reported using self-destruction strategies were less likely to associate with prosocial peers. Adolescents who reported using distraction coping strategies were less likely to associate with deviant peers, and adolescents who reported using self-destruction strategies were more likely to associate with deviant peers. Ethnic identity mediated the relationship between coping and prosocial peer association for African American adolescents. Limitations of the study and future research directions are also presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)431-454
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Black Psychology
Volume39
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

Keywords

  • African American adolescents
  • coping
  • ethnic identity
  • peer relationships

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Applied Psychology

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