Pediatric trauma

experience of a combat support hospital in Iraq

Rebecca McGuigan, Philip C. Spinella, Alec Beekley, James Sebesta, Jeremy Perkins, Kurt Grathwohl, Kenneth Azarow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Purpose: The mission of the combat support hospital (CSH) is to evaluate and treat combatants injured during war operations. The 31st CSH in Balad and Baghdad, Iraq, during Operation Iraqi Freedom 2 also treated many injured civilians, including children. The purpose of this article is to report the experience of the 31st CSH treating pediatric trauma patients. Methods: A retrospective review of a comprehensive patient database collected in theater was conducted. Results: From January 1 to December 31, 2004, we treated 99 patients 17 years and younger. The average age of these patients was 10.6 years. Nine died of their wounds. The mean injury severity score was 11.6. Forty-one sustained gunshot wounds, 13 acquired fragment wounds (55% penetrating), and 22 were injured by improvised explosive devices (22%). Seventy-three patients required a total of 191 operations: 18 celiotomies, 8 craniotomies, 23 skeletal fixations, and 75 wound washout/debridements, among others. Predictors of mortality included admission Glasgow Coma Score less than 4 and admission pH less than 7.1. Conclusions: The primary mission of the CSH in theater remains unchanged, but its role is evolving. With this study, we can begin to understand the needs of wounded children in urban conflict and help guide training and resource allocation in the future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-210
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Iraq
Pediatrics
Wounds and Injuries
2003-2011 Iraq War
Penetrating Wounds
Gunshot Wounds
Fracture Fixation
Injury Severity Score
Pediatric Hospitals
Resource Allocation
Craniotomy
Debridement
Coma
Databases
Equipment and Supplies
Mortality

Keywords

  • Civilian trauma
  • Pediatric injury
  • Pediatric trauma
  • Wartime

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

McGuigan, R., Spinella, P. C., Beekley, A., Sebesta, J., Perkins, J., Grathwohl, K., & Azarow, K. (2007). Pediatric trauma: experience of a combat support hospital in Iraq. Journal of Pediatric Surgery, 42(1), 207-210. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2006.09.020

Pediatric trauma : experience of a combat support hospital in Iraq. / McGuigan, Rebecca; Spinella, Philip C.; Beekley, Alec; Sebesta, James; Perkins, Jeremy; Grathwohl, Kurt; Azarow, Kenneth.

In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery, Vol. 42, No. 1, 01.2007, p. 207-210.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McGuigan, R, Spinella, PC, Beekley, A, Sebesta, J, Perkins, J, Grathwohl, K & Azarow, K 2007, 'Pediatric trauma: experience of a combat support hospital in Iraq', Journal of Pediatric Surgery, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 207-210. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2006.09.020
McGuigan R, Spinella PC, Beekley A, Sebesta J, Perkins J, Grathwohl K et al. Pediatric trauma: experience of a combat support hospital in Iraq. Journal of Pediatric Surgery. 2007 Jan;42(1):207-210. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2006.09.020
McGuigan, Rebecca ; Spinella, Philip C. ; Beekley, Alec ; Sebesta, James ; Perkins, Jeremy ; Grathwohl, Kurt ; Azarow, Kenneth. / Pediatric trauma : experience of a combat support hospital in Iraq. In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery. 2007 ; Vol. 42, No. 1. pp. 207-210.
@article{22bd3ac81915424da02f98a2f196f550,
title = "Pediatric trauma: experience of a combat support hospital in Iraq",
abstract = "Background/Purpose: The mission of the combat support hospital (CSH) is to evaluate and treat combatants injured during war operations. The 31st CSH in Balad and Baghdad, Iraq, during Operation Iraqi Freedom 2 also treated many injured civilians, including children. The purpose of this article is to report the experience of the 31st CSH treating pediatric trauma patients. Methods: A retrospective review of a comprehensive patient database collected in theater was conducted. Results: From January 1 to December 31, 2004, we treated 99 patients 17 years and younger. The average age of these patients was 10.6 years. Nine died of their wounds. The mean injury severity score was 11.6. Forty-one sustained gunshot wounds, 13 acquired fragment wounds (55{\%} penetrating), and 22 were injured by improvised explosive devices (22{\%}). Seventy-three patients required a total of 191 operations: 18 celiotomies, 8 craniotomies, 23 skeletal fixations, and 75 wound washout/debridements, among others. Predictors of mortality included admission Glasgow Coma Score less than 4 and admission pH less than 7.1. Conclusions: The primary mission of the CSH in theater remains unchanged, but its role is evolving. With this study, we can begin to understand the needs of wounded children in urban conflict and help guide training and resource allocation in the future.",
keywords = "Civilian trauma, Pediatric injury, Pediatric trauma, Wartime",
author = "Rebecca McGuigan and Spinella, {Philip C.} and Alec Beekley and James Sebesta and Jeremy Perkins and Kurt Grathwohl and Kenneth Azarow",
year = "2007",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2006.09.020",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "42",
pages = "207--210",
journal = "Journal of Pediatric Surgery",
issn = "0022-3468",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pediatric trauma

T2 - experience of a combat support hospital in Iraq

AU - McGuigan, Rebecca

AU - Spinella, Philip C.

AU - Beekley, Alec

AU - Sebesta, James

AU - Perkins, Jeremy

AU - Grathwohl, Kurt

AU - Azarow, Kenneth

PY - 2007/1

Y1 - 2007/1

N2 - Background/Purpose: The mission of the combat support hospital (CSH) is to evaluate and treat combatants injured during war operations. The 31st CSH in Balad and Baghdad, Iraq, during Operation Iraqi Freedom 2 also treated many injured civilians, including children. The purpose of this article is to report the experience of the 31st CSH treating pediatric trauma patients. Methods: A retrospective review of a comprehensive patient database collected in theater was conducted. Results: From January 1 to December 31, 2004, we treated 99 patients 17 years and younger. The average age of these patients was 10.6 years. Nine died of their wounds. The mean injury severity score was 11.6. Forty-one sustained gunshot wounds, 13 acquired fragment wounds (55% penetrating), and 22 were injured by improvised explosive devices (22%). Seventy-three patients required a total of 191 operations: 18 celiotomies, 8 craniotomies, 23 skeletal fixations, and 75 wound washout/debridements, among others. Predictors of mortality included admission Glasgow Coma Score less than 4 and admission pH less than 7.1. Conclusions: The primary mission of the CSH in theater remains unchanged, but its role is evolving. With this study, we can begin to understand the needs of wounded children in urban conflict and help guide training and resource allocation in the future.

AB - Background/Purpose: The mission of the combat support hospital (CSH) is to evaluate and treat combatants injured during war operations. The 31st CSH in Balad and Baghdad, Iraq, during Operation Iraqi Freedom 2 also treated many injured civilians, including children. The purpose of this article is to report the experience of the 31st CSH treating pediatric trauma patients. Methods: A retrospective review of a comprehensive patient database collected in theater was conducted. Results: From January 1 to December 31, 2004, we treated 99 patients 17 years and younger. The average age of these patients was 10.6 years. Nine died of their wounds. The mean injury severity score was 11.6. Forty-one sustained gunshot wounds, 13 acquired fragment wounds (55% penetrating), and 22 were injured by improvised explosive devices (22%). Seventy-three patients required a total of 191 operations: 18 celiotomies, 8 craniotomies, 23 skeletal fixations, and 75 wound washout/debridements, among others. Predictors of mortality included admission Glasgow Coma Score less than 4 and admission pH less than 7.1. Conclusions: The primary mission of the CSH in theater remains unchanged, but its role is evolving. With this study, we can begin to understand the needs of wounded children in urban conflict and help guide training and resource allocation in the future.

KW - Civilian trauma

KW - Pediatric injury

KW - Pediatric trauma

KW - Wartime

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33845939582&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33845939582&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2006.09.020

DO - 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2006.09.020

M3 - Article

VL - 42

SP - 207

EP - 210

JO - Journal of Pediatric Surgery

JF - Journal of Pediatric Surgery

SN - 0022-3468

IS - 1

ER -