Patients' reasons for choosing office-based buprenorphine: Preference for patient-centered care

Philip (Todd) Korthuis, Jessica Gregg, Wendy E. Rogers, Dennis McCarty, Christina Nicolaidis, Joshua Boverman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To explore human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)- infected patients' attitudes about buprenorphine treatment in officebased and opioid treatment program (OTP) settings. Methods: We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 29 patients with coexisting HIV infection and opioid dependence seeking buprenorphine maintenance therapy in office-based and OTP settings. We used thematic analysis of transcribed audiorecorded interviews to identify themes. Results: Patients voiced a strong preference for office-based treatment. Four themes emerged to explain this preference. First, patients perceived the greater convenience of office-based treatment as improving their ability to address HIV and other healthcare issues. Second, they perceived a strong patient-focused orientation in patient-provider relationships, underpinning their preference for office-based care. This was manifested as increased trust, listening, empathy, and respect from office-based staff and providers. Third, they perceived shared power and responsibility in office-based settings. Finally, patients viewed office-based treatment as a more supportive environment for sobriety and relapse prevention. This was, in part, due to strong therapeutic alliances with office-based staff and providers who prioritized a harm reduction approach and also the perception that the office-based settings were "safer" for sobriety, compared with increased opportunities for purchasing and using illicit opiates in OTP settings. Conclusions: HIV-infected patients with opioid dependence preferred office-based buprenorphine, because they perceived it as offering a more patient-centered approach to care compared with OTP referral. Office-based buprenorphine may facilitate engagement in care for patients with coexisting opioid dependence and HIV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)204-210
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Addiction Medicine
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2010

Fingerprint

Buprenorphine
Patient-Centered Care
Opioid Analgesics
HIV
Therapeutics
Virus Diseases
Opiate Alkaloids
Interviews
Harm Reduction
Aptitude
Secondary Prevention
Patient Care
Referral and Consultation
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Buprenorphine
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Opioid-related disorders
  • Patient-centered care
  • Physician-patient relations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Patients' reasons for choosing office-based buprenorphine : Preference for patient-centered care. / Korthuis, Philip (Todd); Gregg, Jessica; Rogers, Wendy E.; McCarty, Dennis; Nicolaidis, Christina; Boverman, Joshua.

In: Journal of Addiction Medicine, Vol. 4, No. 4, 12.2010, p. 204-210.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Korthuis, Philip (Todd) ; Gregg, Jessica ; Rogers, Wendy E. ; McCarty, Dennis ; Nicolaidis, Christina ; Boverman, Joshua. / Patients' reasons for choosing office-based buprenorphine : Preference for patient-centered care. In: Journal of Addiction Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 4, No. 4. pp. 204-210.
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