Patients on state organ donor registries receive similar levels of intensive care compared to those who are not: An opportunity to increase public intent to donate

Madhukar S. Patel, Shariq S. Raza, Akash Bhakta, Tyler Ewing, Marko Bukur, Parsia A. Vagefi, Ali Salim, Darren Malinoski

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The intent to donate organs is affected by the public perception that patients on state registries receive less aggressive life-saving care in order to allow organ donation to proceed. However, the association between first person authorization to donate organs and the actual care received by eventual organ donors in hospitals is unknown. From August 2010 to April 2011, all eight organ procurement organizations in United Network for Organ Sharing Region 5 prospectively recorded demographic data and organ utilization rates on all donors after neurologic determination of death (DNDDs). Critical care and physiologic parameters were also recorded at referral for imminent neurologic death and prior to authorization for donation to reflect the aggressiveness of provided care. There were 586 DNDDs and 23% were on a state registry. Compared to non-registered DNDDs, those on state registries were older but were noted to have similar critical care parameters at both referral and authorization. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in organs procured per donor or organs transplanted per donor between registered and non-registered DNDDs. Thus, DNDDs who are on state donor registries receive similar levels of intensive care compared to non-registered donors. The association noted in this study may therefore help to dispel a common misperception that decreases the intent to donate.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    JournalClinical Transplantation
    DOIs
    StateAccepted/In press - 2016

    Fingerprint

    Critical Care
    Registries
    Tissue Donors
    Nervous System
    Tissue and Organ Procurement
    Referral and Consultation
    Demography
    Organizations

    Keywords

    • Critical care
    • Donor registration
    • End-of-life decisions
    • First-person authorization
    • Organ donation

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Transplantation

    Cite this

    Patients on state organ donor registries receive similar levels of intensive care compared to those who are not : An opportunity to increase public intent to donate. / Patel, Madhukar S.; Raza, Shariq S.; Bhakta, Akash; Ewing, Tyler; Bukur, Marko; Vagefi, Parsia A.; Salim, Ali; Malinoski, Darren.

    In: Clinical Transplantation, 2016.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    abstract = "The intent to donate organs is affected by the public perception that patients on state registries receive less aggressive life-saving care in order to allow organ donation to proceed. However, the association between first person authorization to donate organs and the actual care received by eventual organ donors in hospitals is unknown. From August 2010 to April 2011, all eight organ procurement organizations in United Network for Organ Sharing Region 5 prospectively recorded demographic data and organ utilization rates on all donors after neurologic determination of death (DNDDs). Critical care and physiologic parameters were also recorded at referral for imminent neurologic death and prior to authorization for donation to reflect the aggressiveness of provided care. There were 586 DNDDs and 23{\%} were on a state registry. Compared to non-registered DNDDs, those on state registries were older but were noted to have similar critical care parameters at both referral and authorization. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in organs procured per donor or organs transplanted per donor between registered and non-registered DNDDs. Thus, DNDDs who are on state donor registries receive similar levels of intensive care compared to non-registered donors. The association noted in this study may therefore help to dispel a common misperception that decreases the intent to donate.",
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