Patient Safety Perceptions in Pediatric Out-of-Hospital Emergency Care: Children's Safety Initiative

Jeanne-Marie Guise, Garth Meckler, Kerth O'Brien, Merlin Curry, Phil Engle, Caitlin Dickinson, Kathryn Dickinson, Matthew Hansen, William Lambert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To characterize emergency medical service (EMS) providers' perceptions of the factors that contribute to safety events and errors in the out-of-hospital emergency care of children. Study design: We used a Delphi process to achieve consensus in a national sample of 753 emergency medicine physicians and EMS professionals. Convergence and stability were achieved in 3 rounds, and findings were reviewed and interpreted by a national expert panel. Results: Forty-four (88%) states were represented, and 66% of participants were retained through all 3 rounds. From an initial set of 150 potential contributing factors derived from focus groups and literature, participants achieved consensus on the following leading contributors: airway management, heightened anxiety caring for children, lack of pediatric skill proficiency, lack of experience with pediatric equipment, and family members leading to delays or interference with care. Somewhat unexpectedly, medications and communication were low-ranking concerns. After thematic analysis, the overarching domains were ranked by their relative importance: (1) clinical assessment; (2) training; (3) clinical decision-making; (4) equipment; (5) medications; (6) scene characteristics; and (7) EMS cultural norms. Conclusions: These findings raise considerations for quality improvement and suggest important roles for pediatricians and pediatric emergency physicians in training, medical oversight, and policy development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 2 2015

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Pediatric Hospitals
Emergency Medical Services
Patient Safety
Safety
Pediatrics
Consensus
Physicians
Equipment and Supplies
Airway Management
Emergency Medicine
Policy Making
Quality Improvement
Focus Groups
Emergencies
Anxiety
Communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Patient Safety Perceptions in Pediatric Out-of-Hospital Emergency Care : Children's Safety Initiative. / Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Meckler, Garth; O'Brien, Kerth; Curry, Merlin; Engle, Phil; Dickinson, Caitlin; Dickinson, Kathryn; Hansen, Matthew; Lambert, William.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, 02.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Guise, Jeanne-Marie ; Meckler, Garth ; O'Brien, Kerth ; Curry, Merlin ; Engle, Phil ; Dickinson, Caitlin ; Dickinson, Kathryn ; Hansen, Matthew ; Lambert, William. / Patient Safety Perceptions in Pediatric Out-of-Hospital Emergency Care : Children's Safety Initiative. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2015.
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