Patient-clinician communication and patient-centered outcomes among patients with suspected stage I non-small cell lung cancer: a prospective cohort study

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Abstract

Among patients with suspected early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we sought to evaluate the association of patient-clinician communication (PCC) with patient-centered outcomes (PCOs). We conducted a multicenter, prospective cohort study examining PCOs at five time points, up to 12-months post-treatment. We used generalized estimating equation (GEE) models adjusted for sociodemographic and clinical variables to examine the relationship between PCC (dichotomized as high- or low-quality) and decisional conflict, treatment self-efficacy, and anxiety. The cohort included 165 patients who were 62% male with a mean age of 70.7 ± SD 8.1 years. Adjusted GEE analysis including 810 observations revealed high-quality PCC was associated with no decisional conflict (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 0.14, 95% CI = 0.07 to 0.27) and higher self-efficacy (β = −0.26, 95% CI = −0.37 to −0.14). High-quality PCC was not associated with moderately severe anxiety (aOR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.41 to 1.09), though was associated with decreased anxiety scores (β = −3.91, 95% CI = −6.48 to −1.35). Among individuals with suspected early-stage NSCLC, high-quality PCC is associated with less decisional conflict and higher self-efficacy; the relationship with anxiety is unclear. Clinicians should prioritize enhanced treatment-related communication at critical and vulnerable periods in the cancer care trajectory to improve PCOs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number203
JournalMedical Oncology
Volume39
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

Keywords

  • Early-stage lung cancer
  • Patient-centered outcomes
  • Patient-clinician communication
  • Prospective cohort

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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