Part C Early Intervention Enrollment in Low Birth Weight Infants At-Risk for Developmental Delays

Kristi L. Atkins, Susanne Duvall, Jill K. Dolata, Patricia Blasco, Sage N. Saxton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives To investigate enrollment patterns in Part C Early Intervention (EI) for low birth weight (LBW) infants (≤2500 g). A secondary aim is to characterize LBW infants that are not enrolled in EI, but would qualify by meeting criteria for a condition associated with a “high-probability” for developmental delays (i.e., Intraventricular Hemorrhage grade III or higher, Apgar score of ≤5 at 5 min, and/or birth weight of ≤1200 g). Methods Data were gathered from 165 LBW infants participating in a high-risk infant follow-up program. Developmental assessment was completed. Basic demographic information and data regarding enrollment in EI were collected via parent questionnaire. Medical variables were extracted from each infant’s electronic medical record. Results 71.5 % of LBW infants were not enrolled in EI. Factors influencing probability of EI enrollment included birth weight, gestational age, developmental test scores, and insurance status. Of the 107 infants living in Oregon who were not enrolled in EI, 42.1 % would qualify for services due to an early medical condition identified in Oregon as a condition associated with a “high-probability” for developmental delays. Conclusions Less than one third of LBW infants were enrolled in EI by their first visit to a high-risk infant follow-up program. Those infants demonstrating developmental delays and public insurance were more likely to be enrolled. The majority of infants who have readily identifiable medical risk factors that qualify them for EI were not enrolled. This study was limited by the constraints implicated by using a clinical sample.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalMaternal and Child Health Journal
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jul 19 2016

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Keywords

  • Health services utilization
  • High-risk infant
  • NICU

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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