Parenting in the Context of Chronic Pain

A Controlled Study of Parents with Chronic Pain

Anna Wilson, Jessica L. Fales

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This study aims to describe what adults with chronic pain experience in their role as parents, utilizing quantitative and qualitative methods. The first aim was to compare parents with chronic pain to parents without chronic pain on perceptions of their adolescent's pain, parental response to pain, and catastrophizing beliefs about pain. The study also examined predictors of parental protective behaviors, and examined whether these associations differed by study group. Materials and Methods: Parents with chronic pain (n=58) and parents without chronic pain (n=72) participated, and completed questionnaire measures of pain characteristics and pain interference, as well as measures of parental catastrophizing and protective pain responses. Parents with chronic pain also completed a structured interview about their experience of being a parent. Interview responses were videotaped and subsequently coded for content. Results: Compared with controls, parents with chronic pain endorsed more pain in their adolescents, and were more likely to catastrophize about their adolescent's pain and respond with protective behaviors. Parent's own pain interference and the perception of higher pain in their adolescent was associated with increased protective parenting in the chronic pain group. Qualitative coding revealed a number of areas of common impact of chronic pain on parenting. Discussion: Chronic pain impacts everyday parenting activities and emotions, and impacts pain-specific parent responses that are known to be related to increased pain and pain catastrophizing in children and adolescents. Parents with chronic pain might benefit from interventions that address potential parenting difficulties, and might improve outcomes for their children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)689-698
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Journal of Pain
Volume31
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 23 2015

Fingerprint

Parenting
Chronic Pain
Parents
Pain
Catastrophization
Pain Perception
Interviews
Emotions

Keywords

  • catastrophizing
  • chronic pain
  • pain responses
  • parenting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Parenting in the Context of Chronic Pain : A Controlled Study of Parents with Chronic Pain. / Wilson, Anna; Fales, Jessica L.

In: Clinical Journal of Pain, Vol. 31, No. 8, 23.07.2015, p. 689-698.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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