Parenting and temperament prior to september 11, 2001, and parenting specific to 9/11 as predictors of children's posttraumatic stress symptoms following 9/11

Anna C. Wilson, Liliana J. Lengua, Andrew N. Meltzoff, Kimberly A. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Parenting is related to children's adjustment, but little research has examined the role of parenting in children's responses to disasters. This study describes parenting responses specific to the 9/11 terrorist attacks and examines pre-9/11 parenting, child temperament, and 9/11-specific parenting as predictors of children's posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms among children geographically distant from the attack locations. A community sample of children and parents (n=137, ages 9-13 years) participating in an ongoing study were interviewed 1 month following 9-11. Parents reported engaging in a number of parenting responses following 9-11. Pre-9-11 acceptance and 9-11-specific, self-focused parental responses predicted PTS symptoms. Pre-9-11 parenting and temperament interacted to predict PTS symptoms, suggesting that parenting and temperament are important prospective predictors of children's responses to indirect exposure to disasters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-459
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 8 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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