Parental psychopathology in the pediatric intensive care unit

Alan S. Graham, Helen Turner, Lisa Madison, Michael Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

While S.T.'s medical care was complex, it was further complicated by what seemed to be PDPs. The father seemed narcissistic, and the mother appeared dependent, deferring all decision making to her husband. The pediatric critical care nurse and the advanced practice nurse are uniquely positioned to identify potential PDPs and minimize the disruption they cause in the care of critically ill children. Key tactics to limiting this disruption are outlined in Table 2. A facilitated debriefing following such challenging cases is critical to ensure future team function and integrity. Avoiding interactions with PDPs in the PICU is not always possible, but early identification, consistent boundaries, and high-level communication among all caregivers can minimize the impact of PDPs on the child's care and the health care team's functioning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-138
Number of pages6
JournalAACN Advanced Critical Care
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2010

Fingerprint

Pediatric Intensive Care Units
Psychopathology
Nurses
Patient Care Team
Critical Care
Child Care
Spouses
Critical Illness
Fathers
Caregivers
Decision Making
Communication
Mothers
Pediatrics
Child Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care
  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Parental psychopathology in the pediatric intensive care unit. / Graham, Alan S.; Turner, Helen; Madison, Lisa; Harris, Michael.

In: AACN Advanced Critical Care, Vol. 21, No. 2, 04.2010, p. 133-138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e218f7dd6d6d43518a41e4e5eeee5051,
title = "Parental psychopathology in the pediatric intensive care unit",
abstract = "While S.T.'s medical care was complex, it was further complicated by what seemed to be PDPs. The father seemed narcissistic, and the mother appeared dependent, deferring all decision making to her husband. The pediatric critical care nurse and the advanced practice nurse are uniquely positioned to identify potential PDPs and minimize the disruption they cause in the care of critically ill children. Key tactics to limiting this disruption are outlined in Table 2. A facilitated debriefing following such challenging cases is critical to ensure future team function and integrity. Avoiding interactions with PDPs in the PICU is not always possible, but early identification, consistent boundaries, and high-level communication among all caregivers can minimize the impact of PDPs on the child's care and the health care team's functioning.",
author = "Graham, {Alan S.} and Helen Turner and Lisa Madison and Michael Harris",
year = "2010",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1097/NCI.0b013e3181d1ee2b",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "133--138",
journal = "AACN Advanced Critical Care",
issn = "1559-7768",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Parental psychopathology in the pediatric intensive care unit

AU - Graham, Alan S.

AU - Turner, Helen

AU - Madison, Lisa

AU - Harris, Michael

PY - 2010/4

Y1 - 2010/4

N2 - While S.T.'s medical care was complex, it was further complicated by what seemed to be PDPs. The father seemed narcissistic, and the mother appeared dependent, deferring all decision making to her husband. The pediatric critical care nurse and the advanced practice nurse are uniquely positioned to identify potential PDPs and minimize the disruption they cause in the care of critically ill children. Key tactics to limiting this disruption are outlined in Table 2. A facilitated debriefing following such challenging cases is critical to ensure future team function and integrity. Avoiding interactions with PDPs in the PICU is not always possible, but early identification, consistent boundaries, and high-level communication among all caregivers can minimize the impact of PDPs on the child's care and the health care team's functioning.

AB - While S.T.'s medical care was complex, it was further complicated by what seemed to be PDPs. The father seemed narcissistic, and the mother appeared dependent, deferring all decision making to her husband. The pediatric critical care nurse and the advanced practice nurse are uniquely positioned to identify potential PDPs and minimize the disruption they cause in the care of critically ill children. Key tactics to limiting this disruption are outlined in Table 2. A facilitated debriefing following such challenging cases is critical to ensure future team function and integrity. Avoiding interactions with PDPs in the PICU is not always possible, but early identification, consistent boundaries, and high-level communication among all caregivers can minimize the impact of PDPs on the child's care and the health care team's functioning.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77951997110&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77951997110&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/NCI.0b013e3181d1ee2b

DO - 10.1097/NCI.0b013e3181d1ee2b

M3 - Article

C2 - 20431441

AN - SCOPUS:77951997110

VL - 21

SP - 133

EP - 138

JO - AACN Advanced Critical Care

JF - AACN Advanced Critical Care

SN - 1559-7768

IS - 2

ER -