Palliative care needs of cancer patients in U.S. nursing homes

Vanessa M.P. Johnson, Joan Teno, Meg Bourbonniere, Vincent Mor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Increasingly, nursing homes are the place of care for older Americans with cancer. Yet, few studies has characterized the quality of care for this growing population. Objective: Characterize the scope and quality of cancer care in U.S. nursing homes. Design: Secondary analysis of the national repository of the Minimum Data Set (MDS) Setting and Subjects: Nursing home residents noted to have cancer diagnosis on the MDS. Results: Of the 190,769 New Hampshire residents (8.8%) with a cancer diagnosis, 1 in 4 had weight loss (23.4%), received intravenous medications (27.7%), or used oxygen (25.4%). Overall, 45.3% had a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order, with state variations ranging from 17.8% (New Jersey) to 70.5% (Wisconsin). More than 1 in 10 (12.0%) were defined as terminally ill, although only 29.3% of these received hospice services. Among patients with pain, half of those who survived to a second assessment had persistent, severe pain (51.3%), which also varied by state, ranging from 43.3% (Iowa) to 65.8% (Nevada). Active treatment was rare; less than 5% received chemotherapy or radiotherapy. However, 15.5% had parenteral and/or tube feedings for nutrition. Approximately, 1 in 10 New Hampshire residents had advanced cancer. Conclusion: Our findings suggest important opportunities to improve the quality of cancer care for older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)273-279
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of palliative medicine
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Nursing Homes
Palliative Care
Quality of Health Care
Neoplasms
Resuscitation Orders
Pain
Terminally Ill
Hospices
Parenteral Nutrition
Enteral Nutrition
Home Care Services
Weight Loss
Radiotherapy
Oxygen
Drug Therapy
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Palliative care needs of cancer patients in U.S. nursing homes. / Johnson, Vanessa M.P.; Teno, Joan; Bourbonniere, Meg; Mor, Vincent.

In: Journal of palliative medicine, Vol. 8, No. 2, 01.04.2005, p. 273-279.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnson, Vanessa M.P. ; Teno, Joan ; Bourbonniere, Meg ; Mor, Vincent. / Palliative care needs of cancer patients in U.S. nursing homes. In: Journal of palliative medicine. 2005 ; Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. 273-279.
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