Oxic, suboxic, and anoxic conditions in the Black Sea

Keith Stewart, Steven Kassakian, Marta Krynytzky, Doug Dijulio, James W. Murray

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Black Sea is the classic marine anoxic basin. It possesses an oxygenated surface layer that overlies a sulfide containing (anoxic) deep layer. This condition has evolved because the water column displays a strong density stratification arising because water with high salinity enters from the Bosporus Strait and mixes with water from an overlying cold intermediate layer (CIL). The CIL forms in the winter on the northwestern shelf and in the western gyre, and its rate of formation varies in response to changing climate. This mixture of Bosporus outflow and CIL produces the Bosporus Plume, which ventilates the deep layers of the Black Sea. New data about biogeochemical distributions of oxygen, sulfide, nitrate, and ammonium were obtained during R/V Knorr research cruises in 2001 and 2003. Oxygen is consumed by respiration of sinking organic matter, and sulfate reduction in the deep water results in the accumulation of hydrogen sulfide. Distributions in the upper layers reflect a classic example of the connection between climate forcing, physical regime, chemical fluxes, and biological response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Black Sea Flood Question
Subtitle of host publicationChanges in Coastline, Climate, and Human Settlement
PublisherSpringer Netherlands
Pages1-21
Number of pages21
ISBN (Print)1402047746, 9781402047749
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

suboxic conditions
oxic conditions
anoxic conditions
sulfide
oxygen
climate forcing
hydrogen sulfide
gyre
Black Sea
strait
surface layer
respiration
stratification
outflow
ammonium
deep water
plume
water column
sulfate
nitrate

Keywords

  • oxygen
  • salinity
  • suboxic zone
  • sulfide
  • temperature
  • ventilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Stewart, K., Kassakian, S., Krynytzky, M., Dijulio, D., & Murray, J. W. (2007). Oxic, suboxic, and anoxic conditions in the Black Sea. In The Black Sea Flood Question: Changes in Coastline, Climate, and Human Settlement (pp. 1-21). Springer Netherlands. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-5302-3_1

Oxic, suboxic, and anoxic conditions in the Black Sea. / Stewart, Keith; Kassakian, Steven; Krynytzky, Marta; Dijulio, Doug; Murray, James W.

The Black Sea Flood Question: Changes in Coastline, Climate, and Human Settlement. Springer Netherlands, 2007. p. 1-21.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Stewart, K, Kassakian, S, Krynytzky, M, Dijulio, D & Murray, JW 2007, Oxic, suboxic, and anoxic conditions in the Black Sea. in The Black Sea Flood Question: Changes in Coastline, Climate, and Human Settlement. Springer Netherlands, pp. 1-21. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-5302-3_1
Stewart K, Kassakian S, Krynytzky M, Dijulio D, Murray JW. Oxic, suboxic, and anoxic conditions in the Black Sea. In The Black Sea Flood Question: Changes in Coastline, Climate, and Human Settlement. Springer Netherlands. 2007. p. 1-21 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-5302-3_1
Stewart, Keith ; Kassakian, Steven ; Krynytzky, Marta ; Dijulio, Doug ; Murray, James W. / Oxic, suboxic, and anoxic conditions in the Black Sea. The Black Sea Flood Question: Changes in Coastline, Climate, and Human Settlement. Springer Netherlands, 2007. pp. 1-21
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