Overweight and obesity in hemophilia: A systematic review of the literature

Trisha E. Wong, Suvankar Majumdar, Elizabeth Adams, Sarah Bergman, Mary Lou Damiano, Joann Deutsche, Michael Recht

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

Context: As life expectancy in individuals with congenital hemophilia approaches that of the general population, we hypothesize that public health risks, including overweight and obesity, also follow a similar trend. Evidence acquisition: A search of the literature included terms relating to overweight, sequelae of being overweight, and hemophilia. Studies were included if they reported the frequency or clinical significance of known complications of overweight and obesity, including musculoskeletal disease, aerobic capacity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, decreased quality of life, and change in pharmacokinetics of infused clotting factor in hemophilia. Recommendations from medical organizations were searched for preventive and management strategies applicable to this population. Evidence synthesis: Overweight and obesity are now more prevalent in the hemophilia population than previous generations, with rates similar to and, in certain subsets even higher, than that of the general population. Increased BMI leads to limitations in joint range of motion in the general population and even more so in persons with hemophilia. Conclusions: Overweight and obesity in hemophilia are an increasing problem. Simple steps can be taken to encourage patients to decrease caloric intake and increase physical activity. Prevention and management of overweight, obesity, and their sequelae must be addressed in clinical practice in order to maximize the overall health of the hemophilia population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S369-S375
JournalAmerican journal of preventive medicine
Volume41
Issue number6 SUPPL.4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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