Overlooking

A sign of bilateral central scotomata in children

W. V. Good, L. S. Crain, R. D. Quint, T. K. Koch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Four children are reported who always looked above objects of visual interest (overlooking). All had bilateral central scotomata (loss of central visual field). Three had optic nerve disease selectively affecting the papillomacular fibers; the fourth had ocular colobomata affecting the maculae. Overlooking is an important sign of bilateral central scotomata in children: it is an adaptation to loss of central vision.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-73
Number of pages5
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Volume34
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Scotoma
Coloboma
Optic Nerve Diseases
Visual Fields
Hereditary macular coloboma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Good, W. V., Crain, L. S., Quint, R. D., & Koch, T. K. (1992). Overlooking: A sign of bilateral central scotomata in children. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 34(1), 69-73.

Overlooking : A sign of bilateral central scotomata in children. / Good, W. V.; Crain, L. S.; Quint, R. D.; Koch, T. K.

In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, Vol. 34, No. 1, 1992, p. 69-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Good, WV, Crain, LS, Quint, RD & Koch, TK 1992, 'Overlooking: A sign of bilateral central scotomata in children', Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 69-73.
Good, W. V. ; Crain, L. S. ; Quint, R. D. ; Koch, T. K. / Overlooking : A sign of bilateral central scotomata in children. In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology. 1992 ; Vol. 34, No. 1. pp. 69-73.
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