Outcomes of integrated behavioral health with primary care

Bijal A. Balasubramanian, Deborah Cohen, Katelyn K. Jetelina, L. Miriam Dickinson, Melinda Davis, Rose Gunn, Kris Gowen, Frank V. DeGruy, Benjamin F. Miller, Larry A. Green

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Integrating behavioral health and primary care is beneficial to patients and health systems. However, for integration to be widely adopted, studies demonstrating its benefits in community practices are needed. The objective of this study was to evaluate effect of integrated care, adapted to local contexts, on depression severity and patients' experience of care. Methods: This study used a convergent mixed-methods design, merging findings from a quasi-experimental study with patient interviews conducted as part of Advancing Care Together, a community demonstration project that created an innovation incubator for practices implementing evidence-based integration strategies. The study included 475 patients with a 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) score ≥10 at baseline, from 5 practices. Results: Statistically significant reductions in mean PHQ-9 scores were observed in all practices, ranging from 2.72 to 6.46 points. Clinically, 50% of patients had a ≥5-point reduction in PHQ-9 score and 32% had a ≥50% reduction. This finding was corroborated by patient interviews that demonstrated positive experiences with behavioral health clinicians and acquiring new skills to cope with adverse situations at work and home. Conclusions: Integrating behavioral health and primary care, when adapted to fit into community practices, reduced depression severity and enhanced patients' experience of care. Integration is a worthwhile investment; clinical leaders, policymakers, and payers should support integration in their communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)130-139
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Board of Family Medicine
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

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Primary Health Care
Patient Care
Health
Interviews
Incubators
Evidence-Based Practice

Keywords

  • Behavioral Medicine
  • Community Health Services
  • Depression
  • Integrated Health Care Systems
  • Primary Health Care
  • Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Family Practice

Cite this

Outcomes of integrated behavioral health with primary care. / Balasubramanian, Bijal A.; Cohen, Deborah; Jetelina, Katelyn K.; Dickinson, L. Miriam; Davis, Melinda; Gunn, Rose; Gowen, Kris; DeGruy, Frank V.; Miller, Benjamin F.; Green, Larry A.

In: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, Vol. 30, No. 2, 01.03.2017, p. 130-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Balasubramanian, BA, Cohen, D, Jetelina, KK, Dickinson, LM, Davis, M, Gunn, R, Gowen, K, DeGruy, FV, Miller, BF & Green, LA 2017, 'Outcomes of integrated behavioral health with primary care', Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 130-139. https://doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2017.02.160234
Balasubramanian, Bijal A. ; Cohen, Deborah ; Jetelina, Katelyn K. ; Dickinson, L. Miriam ; Davis, Melinda ; Gunn, Rose ; Gowen, Kris ; DeGruy, Frank V. ; Miller, Benjamin F. ; Green, Larry A. / Outcomes of integrated behavioral health with primary care. In: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 30, No. 2. pp. 130-139.
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