Outcome of venous stasis ulceration when complicated by arterial occlusive disease

W. T. Bohannon, Robert Mclafferty, S. T. Chaney, M. A. Mattos, L. A. Gruneiro, D. E. Ramsey, K. J. Hodgson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: to report the outcome of patients with venous stasis ulceration (VSU) and severe arterial occlusive disease (AOD). Design: retrospective study. Methods: using the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9), codes for VSU and AOD were cross-matched to identify patients from 1989 to 1999 at two tertiary hospitals. Entry into the study required the presence of a VSU and an ipsilateral procedure to improve AOD or major amputation during the same hospitalisation. Results: fourteen patients (15 extremities) with a mean age of 80 years (range: 47-93) were identified as having VSU and AOD. Mean duration of VSU up to the time of revascularisation or amputation was 6.4 years (range: 4 months-21 years). The mean number of VSUs per extremity was 2.1 and mean wound area was 71 cm2. Mean ankle-brachial index was 0.46 (range: 0.10-0.78). Nine extremities (60%) had a bypass procedure, 3 (20%) had an interventional procedure, 1 (0.6%) had a lumbar sympathectomy, and 2 (13%) had an amputation. Over a mean follow-up of 2.8 years, 3 extremities (23%) healed of which 2 recurred. On last review, 11 patients with 12 afflicted extremities had expired. Nine of the remaining 10 extremities were not healed at the time of death. Eight of nine bypass grafts remained patent in follow-up or at death and subsequent limb salvage was 100%. Conclusions: combined VSU and AOD represents a rare condition predominantly found in elderly patients with multiple comorbidities. Few patients had complete healing despite an arterial inflow procedure and mortality was high over the short term.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-254
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Arterial Occlusive Diseases
Extremities
International Classification of Diseases
Amputation
Ankle Brachial Index
Limb Salvage
Sympathectomy
Tertiary Care Centers
Comorbidity
Hospitalization
Retrospective Studies
Transplants
Mortality
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Arterial occlusive disease
  • Outcome
  • Venous stasis ulcer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Surgery

Cite this

Outcome of venous stasis ulceration when complicated by arterial occlusive disease. / Bohannon, W. T.; Mclafferty, Robert; Chaney, S. T.; Mattos, M. A.; Gruneiro, L. A.; Ramsey, D. E.; Hodgson, K. J.

In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Vol. 24, No. 3, 09.2002, p. 249-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bohannon, W. T. ; Mclafferty, Robert ; Chaney, S. T. ; Mattos, M. A. ; Gruneiro, L. A. ; Ramsey, D. E. ; Hodgson, K. J. / Outcome of venous stasis ulceration when complicated by arterial occlusive disease. In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery. 2002 ; Vol. 24, No. 3. pp. 249-254.
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AB - Objective: to report the outcome of patients with venous stasis ulceration (VSU) and severe arterial occlusive disease (AOD). Design: retrospective study. Methods: using the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9), codes for VSU and AOD were cross-matched to identify patients from 1989 to 1999 at two tertiary hospitals. Entry into the study required the presence of a VSU and an ipsilateral procedure to improve AOD or major amputation during the same hospitalisation. Results: fourteen patients (15 extremities) with a mean age of 80 years (range: 47-93) were identified as having VSU and AOD. Mean duration of VSU up to the time of revascularisation or amputation was 6.4 years (range: 4 months-21 years). The mean number of VSUs per extremity was 2.1 and mean wound area was 71 cm2. Mean ankle-brachial index was 0.46 (range: 0.10-0.78). Nine extremities (60%) had a bypass procedure, 3 (20%) had an interventional procedure, 1 (0.6%) had a lumbar sympathectomy, and 2 (13%) had an amputation. Over a mean follow-up of 2.8 years, 3 extremities (23%) healed of which 2 recurred. On last review, 11 patients with 12 afflicted extremities had expired. Nine of the remaining 10 extremities were not healed at the time of death. Eight of nine bypass grafts remained patent in follow-up or at death and subsequent limb salvage was 100%. Conclusions: combined VSU and AOD represents a rare condition predominantly found in elderly patients with multiple comorbidities. Few patients had complete healing despite an arterial inflow procedure and mortality was high over the short term.

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