Ototoxicity in children with high-risk neuroblastoma: Prevalence, risk factors, and concordance of grading scales - A report from the Children's Oncology Group

Wendy Landier, Kristin Knight, F. Lennie Wong, Jin Lee, Ola Thomas, Heeyoung Kim, Susan G. Kreissman, Mary Lou Schmidt, Lu Chen, Wendy B. London, James G. Gurney, Smita Bhatia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Purpose: Platinum-based therapy is the mainstay for management of high-risk neuroblastoma. Prevalence of platinum-related ototoxicity has ranged from 13% to 95% in previous reports; variability is attributable to small samples and disparate grading scales. There is no consensus regarding optimal ototoxicity grading. Furthermore, prevalence and predictors of hearing loss in a large uniformly treated high-risk neuroblastoma population are unknown. We address these gaps in our study. Patients and Methods: Audiologic testing was completed after administration of cisplatin alone (<400 mg/m2; exposure one) or after cisplatin (400 mg/m2) plus carboplatin (1,700 mg/m 2; exposure two). Hearing loss was graded using four scales (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association; Brock; Chang; and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3 [CTCAEv3]). Results: Of 489 eligible patients, 333 had evaluable audiologic data. Median age at diagnosis was 3.3 years. Prevalence of severe hearing loss differed by scale. For those in the exposure-one group, prevalence ranged from 8% per Brock to 47% per CTCAEv3 (Brock v CTCAEv3 and Chang, P <.01; CTCAEv3 v Chang, P = .16); for those in the exposure-two group, prevalence ranged from 30% per Brock to 71% per CTCAEv3 (all pair-wise comparisons, P <.01). In patients requiring hearing aids, hearing loss was graded as severe in 49% (Brock), 91% (Chang), and 100% (CTCAEv3). Risk factors for severe hearing loss included exposure to cisplatin and carboplatin compared with cisplatin alone and hospitalization for infection. Conclusion: Severe hearing loss is prevalent among children with high-risk neuroblastoma. Exposure to cisplatin combined with myeloablative carboplatin significantly increases risk. The Brock scale underestimates severe hearing loss and should be used with caution in this setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)527-534
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 20 2014

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Neuroblastoma
Hearing Loss
Terminology
Cisplatin
Carboplatin
Platinum
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Hearing Aids
Risk Management
Hospitalization
Infection
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ototoxicity in children with high-risk neuroblastoma : Prevalence, risk factors, and concordance of grading scales - A report from the Children's Oncology Group. / Landier, Wendy; Knight, Kristin; Wong, F. Lennie; Lee, Jin; Thomas, Ola; Kim, Heeyoung; Kreissman, Susan G.; Schmidt, Mary Lou; Chen, Lu; London, Wendy B.; Gurney, James G.; Bhatia, Smita.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 32, No. 6, 20.02.2014, p. 527-534.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Landier, W, Knight, K, Wong, FL, Lee, J, Thomas, O, Kim, H, Kreissman, SG, Schmidt, ML, Chen, L, London, WB, Gurney, JG & Bhatia, S 2014, 'Ototoxicity in children with high-risk neuroblastoma: Prevalence, risk factors, and concordance of grading scales - A report from the Children's Oncology Group', Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 32, no. 6, pp. 527-534. https://doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2013.51.2038
Landier, Wendy ; Knight, Kristin ; Wong, F. Lennie ; Lee, Jin ; Thomas, Ola ; Kim, Heeyoung ; Kreissman, Susan G. ; Schmidt, Mary Lou ; Chen, Lu ; London, Wendy B. ; Gurney, James G. ; Bhatia, Smita. / Ototoxicity in children with high-risk neuroblastoma : Prevalence, risk factors, and concordance of grading scales - A report from the Children's Oncology Group. In: Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2014 ; Vol. 32, No. 6. pp. 527-534.
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abstract = "Purpose: Platinum-based therapy is the mainstay for management of high-risk neuroblastoma. Prevalence of platinum-related ototoxicity has ranged from 13{\%} to 95{\%} in previous reports; variability is attributable to small samples and disparate grading scales. There is no consensus regarding optimal ototoxicity grading. Furthermore, prevalence and predictors of hearing loss in a large uniformly treated high-risk neuroblastoma population are unknown. We address these gaps in our study. Patients and Methods: Audiologic testing was completed after administration of cisplatin alone (<400 mg/m2; exposure one) or after cisplatin (400 mg/m2) plus carboplatin (1,700 mg/m 2; exposure two). Hearing loss was graded using four scales (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association; Brock; Chang; and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3 [CTCAEv3]). Results: Of 489 eligible patients, 333 had evaluable audiologic data. Median age at diagnosis was 3.3 years. Prevalence of severe hearing loss differed by scale. For those in the exposure-one group, prevalence ranged from 8{\%} per Brock to 47{\%} per CTCAEv3 (Brock v CTCAEv3 and Chang, P <.01; CTCAEv3 v Chang, P = .16); for those in the exposure-two group, prevalence ranged from 30{\%} per Brock to 71{\%} per CTCAEv3 (all pair-wise comparisons, P <.01). In patients requiring hearing aids, hearing loss was graded as severe in 49{\%} (Brock), 91{\%} (Chang), and 100{\%} (CTCAEv3). Risk factors for severe hearing loss included exposure to cisplatin and carboplatin compared with cisplatin alone and hospitalization for infection. Conclusion: Severe hearing loss is prevalent among children with high-risk neuroblastoma. Exposure to cisplatin combined with myeloablative carboplatin significantly increases risk. The Brock scale underestimates severe hearing loss and should be used with caution in this setting.",
author = "Wendy Landier and Kristin Knight and Wong, {F. Lennie} and Jin Lee and Ola Thomas and Heeyoung Kim and Kreissman, {Susan G.} and Schmidt, {Mary Lou} and Lu Chen and London, {Wendy B.} and Gurney, {James G.} and Smita Bhatia",
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T2 - Prevalence, risk factors, and concordance of grading scales - A report from the Children's Oncology Group

AU - Landier, Wendy

AU - Knight, Kristin

AU - Wong, F. Lennie

AU - Lee, Jin

AU - Thomas, Ola

AU - Kim, Heeyoung

AU - Kreissman, Susan G.

AU - Schmidt, Mary Lou

AU - Chen, Lu

AU - London, Wendy B.

AU - Gurney, James G.

AU - Bhatia, Smita

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N2 - Purpose: Platinum-based therapy is the mainstay for management of high-risk neuroblastoma. Prevalence of platinum-related ototoxicity has ranged from 13% to 95% in previous reports; variability is attributable to small samples and disparate grading scales. There is no consensus regarding optimal ototoxicity grading. Furthermore, prevalence and predictors of hearing loss in a large uniformly treated high-risk neuroblastoma population are unknown. We address these gaps in our study. Patients and Methods: Audiologic testing was completed after administration of cisplatin alone (<400 mg/m2; exposure one) or after cisplatin (400 mg/m2) plus carboplatin (1,700 mg/m 2; exposure two). Hearing loss was graded using four scales (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association; Brock; Chang; and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3 [CTCAEv3]). Results: Of 489 eligible patients, 333 had evaluable audiologic data. Median age at diagnosis was 3.3 years. Prevalence of severe hearing loss differed by scale. For those in the exposure-one group, prevalence ranged from 8% per Brock to 47% per CTCAEv3 (Brock v CTCAEv3 and Chang, P <.01; CTCAEv3 v Chang, P = .16); for those in the exposure-two group, prevalence ranged from 30% per Brock to 71% per CTCAEv3 (all pair-wise comparisons, P <.01). In patients requiring hearing aids, hearing loss was graded as severe in 49% (Brock), 91% (Chang), and 100% (CTCAEv3). Risk factors for severe hearing loss included exposure to cisplatin and carboplatin compared with cisplatin alone and hospitalization for infection. Conclusion: Severe hearing loss is prevalent among children with high-risk neuroblastoma. Exposure to cisplatin combined with myeloablative carboplatin significantly increases risk. The Brock scale underestimates severe hearing loss and should be used with caution in this setting.

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