Osmoregulation: Some principles of water and solute transport

David C. Dawson, Xuehong Liu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Living cells have developed the ability to persist in the face of a fundamental contradiction. On the one hand, they preserve an internal composition that is an optimal milieu for metabolic processes that are essential to the maintenance of the living state and maintain the ability to regulate that composition as a defense against external perturbations. On the other hand, the maintenance of this environment and the nature of the associated regulatory processes demand that matter be continuously shuttled in and out of the cell. In other words, cells must maintain an internal composition that is constant but is also not in equilibrium with its environment. Cellular composition is maintained in a so-called “steady state” in the face of constant in and out traffic across the cell membrane.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationOsmotic and Ionic Regulation
Subtitle of host publicationCells and Animals
PublisherCRC Press
Pages1-35
Number of pages35
ISBN (Electronic)9780849380525
ISBN (Print)9780849380303
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

Fingerprint

Osmoregulation
Solute transport
osmoregulation
Water
Chemical analysis
Maintenance
water
cells
traffic
preserves
cell membranes
Cell membranes
Cell Membrane
Cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Dawson, D. C., & Liu, X. (2008). Osmoregulation: Some principles of water and solute transport. In Osmotic and Ionic Regulation: Cells and Animals (pp. 1-35). CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/9780849380525

Osmoregulation : Some principles of water and solute transport. / Dawson, David C.; Liu, Xuehong.

Osmotic and Ionic Regulation: Cells and Animals. CRC Press, 2008. p. 1-35.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Dawson, DC & Liu, X 2008, Osmoregulation: Some principles of water and solute transport. in Osmotic and Ionic Regulation: Cells and Animals. CRC Press, pp. 1-35. https://doi.org/10.1201/9780849380525
Dawson DC, Liu X. Osmoregulation: Some principles of water and solute transport. In Osmotic and Ionic Regulation: Cells and Animals. CRC Press. 2008. p. 1-35 https://doi.org/10.1201/9780849380525
Dawson, David C. ; Liu, Xuehong. / Osmoregulation : Some principles of water and solute transport. Osmotic and Ionic Regulation: Cells and Animals. CRC Press, 2008. pp. 1-35
@inbook{cfc0b4fa27b04613b0dd0c97d6b8fb07,
title = "Osmoregulation: Some principles of water and solute transport",
abstract = "Living cells have developed the ability to persist in the face of a fundamental contradiction. On the one hand, they preserve an internal composition that is an optimal milieu for metabolic processes that are essential to the maintenance of the living state and maintain the ability to regulate that composition as a defense against external perturbations. On the other hand, the maintenance of this environment and the nature of the associated regulatory processes demand that matter be continuously shuttled in and out of the cell. In other words, cells must maintain an internal composition that is constant but is also not in equilibrium with its environment. Cellular composition is maintained in a so-called “steady state” in the face of constant in and out traffic across the cell membrane.",
author = "Dawson, {David C.} and Xuehong Liu",
year = "2008",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1201/9780849380525",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9780849380303",
pages = "1--35",
booktitle = "Osmotic and Ionic Regulation",
publisher = "CRC Press",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Osmoregulation

T2 - Some principles of water and solute transport

AU - Dawson, David C.

AU - Liu, Xuehong

PY - 2008/1/1

Y1 - 2008/1/1

N2 - Living cells have developed the ability to persist in the face of a fundamental contradiction. On the one hand, they preserve an internal composition that is an optimal milieu for metabolic processes that are essential to the maintenance of the living state and maintain the ability to regulate that composition as a defense against external perturbations. On the other hand, the maintenance of this environment and the nature of the associated regulatory processes demand that matter be continuously shuttled in and out of the cell. In other words, cells must maintain an internal composition that is constant but is also not in equilibrium with its environment. Cellular composition is maintained in a so-called “steady state” in the face of constant in and out traffic across the cell membrane.

AB - Living cells have developed the ability to persist in the face of a fundamental contradiction. On the one hand, they preserve an internal composition that is an optimal milieu for metabolic processes that are essential to the maintenance of the living state and maintain the ability to regulate that composition as a defense against external perturbations. On the other hand, the maintenance of this environment and the nature of the associated regulatory processes demand that matter be continuously shuttled in and out of the cell. In other words, cells must maintain an internal composition that is constant but is also not in equilibrium with its environment. Cellular composition is maintained in a so-called “steady state” in the face of constant in and out traffic across the cell membrane.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85042697567&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85042697567&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1201/9780849380525

DO - 10.1201/9780849380525

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:85042697567

SN - 9780849380303

SP - 1

EP - 35

BT - Osmotic and Ionic Regulation

PB - CRC Press

ER -