Oregon's medicaid transformation-observations on organizational structure and strategy

Anna Marie Chang, Deborah Cohen, Dennis McCarty, Traci Rieckmann, Kenneth (John) McConnell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the Point article, Steven W. Howard et al. argue that the Oregon Health Authority's coordinated care organizations (CCOs) are different from traditional Medicaid managed care organizations in ways designed to improve care coordination and transparency, incorporate greater collaborative governance and community accountability, and reform payment and delivery of care. Although the Point article notes specific challenges to implementing reforms, this Counterpoint article identifies the progress and successes of Oregon's CCOs in each of the aforementioned areas on the basis of empirical research, which suggests that CCOs appear to be viable innovations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)257-264
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Health Politics, Policy and Law
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Medicaid
Organizations
Empirical Research
Social Responsibility
Managed Care Programs
Health

Keywords

  • Coordinated care organizations
  • Managed care
  • Medicaid
  • State health reform

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Oregon's medicaid transformation-observations on organizational structure and strategy. / Chang, Anna Marie; Cohen, Deborah; McCarty, Dennis; Rieckmann, Traci; McConnell, Kenneth (John).

In: Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law, Vol. 40, No. 1, 2015, p. 257-264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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