Oral health and dental care in modern-day China

H. C. Lin, Eli Schwarz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to present salient background information on the oral care situation and organization in China and to review epidemiological literature that has been published on adults in Chinese dental journals during the last 20 years as a context for understanding ongoing oral health research activities in China. Searches were conducted through Medline as well as Chinese language catalogues and around 30 Chinese dental journals. Most oral health surveys on adults were conducted after 1970 mainly on residents living in big cities, which are also the location of major medical universities. Surveys conducted among farmers were uncommon. Dental caries and periodontal disease were the major dental diseases studied. Only a few surveys on people's oral health knowledge, attitudes and behavior were conducted. Papers concerning dental treatment needs and utilization of dental services among adults were scarce. Sample size was usually not a major problem in these surveys but the sampling methods and diagnostic criteria used were often poorly defined. Mean DMFT scores between 2 and 6 were reported in the 35-44-year-olds and between 9 and 16 in the elderly younger than 75 years. Calculus and gingivitis were reported to be common in adult Chinese; the proportion of subjects with shallow and deep periodontal pockets was not high. Complete edentulousness in the 60-69-year-olds was usually reported to be less than 10%. About 14% of the 35-44-year-olds and 19% of the 65-74-year-olds did not brush their teeth daily.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-328
Number of pages10
JournalCommunity Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology
Volume29
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dental Care
Oral Health
China
Tooth
Delivery of Health Care
Stomatognathic Diseases
Periodontal Pocket
Attitude to Health
Gingivitis
Calculi
Dental Caries
Periodontal Diseases
Health Surveys
Sample Size
Language
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Behavior
  • China
  • Dental caries
  • Dental personnel
  • Health care administration
  • Health surveys
  • Periodontal diseases
  • Research design

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Oral health and dental care in modern-day China. / Lin, H. C.; Schwarz, Eli.

In: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, Vol. 29, No. 5, 2001, p. 319-328.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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