Operative versus nonoperative management of blunt abdominal trauma: Role of ultrasound-measured intraperitoneal fluid levels

Oscar Ma, Michael P. Kefer, Kathleen F. Stevison, James R. Mateer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study's objective was to analyze whether the quantity of free intraperitoneal fluid on ultrasonography, alone or in combination with unstable vital signs, is sensitive in determining the need for laparotomy in patients presenting with blunt trauma. Adult patients who presented with blunt abdominal trauma to 2 level I trauma centers were enrolled. Combined intraperitoneal fluid levels (anechoic stripe) of 5 intraperitoneal areas were measured and defined as small (<1.0 cm), moderate (> 1.0 cm, <3.0 cm), or large (> 3.0 cm). Unstable vital signs were defined as pulse > 100 bpm or systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg. Exploratory laparotomy or computed tomography scan confirmed hemoperitoneum. Of 270 patients entered into the study, ultrasound detected free intraperitoneal fluid in 33 patients. Of the 18 patients with a large fluid accumulation, 16 underwent exploratory laparotomy (89% sensitivity), and all 8 patients with unstable vital signs underwent exploratory laparotomy (100% sensitivity). Of the 10 patients with a moderate fluid accumulation, 6 underwent exploratory laparotomy (60% sensitivity), and 4 of the 6 patients with unstable vital signs underwent exploratory laparotomy (67% sensitivity). A large intraperitoneal fluid accumulation on ultrasonography in combination with unstable vital signs, is sensitive for determining the need for exploratory laparotomy in patients presenting with blunt trauma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)284-286
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Laparotomy
Vital Signs
Wounds and Injuries
Ultrasonography
Blood Pressure
Hemoperitoneum
Trauma Centers
Tomography

Keywords

  • Hemoperitoneum
  • Trauma
  • Ultrasound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Operative versus nonoperative management of blunt abdominal trauma : Role of ultrasound-measured intraperitoneal fluid levels. / Ma, Oscar; Kefer, Michael P.; Stevison, Kathleen F.; Mateer, James R.

In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 19, No. 4, 2001, p. 284-286.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ma, Oscar ; Kefer, Michael P. ; Stevison, Kathleen F. ; Mateer, James R. / Operative versus nonoperative management of blunt abdominal trauma : Role of ultrasound-measured intraperitoneal fluid levels. In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2001 ; Vol. 19, No. 4. pp. 284-286.
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