Once-daily oral sarecycline 1.5 mg/kg/day is effective for moderate to severe acne vulgaris: Results from two identically designed, phase 3, randomized, double-blind clinical trials

Angela Moore, Lawrence J. Green, Suzanne Bruce, Neil Sadick, Eduardo Tschen, Philip Werschler, Fran E. Cook-Bolden, Sunil S. Dhawan, Douglass Forsha, Michael H. Gold, Scott Guenthner, Steven E. Kempers, Leon H. Kircik, Jennifer L. Parish, Marta I. Rendon, Phoebe Rich, Linda Stein-Gold, Stephen K. Tyring, Robert A. Weiss, Adnan NasirCarsten Schmitz, Terry I. Boodhoo, Alexandre Kaoukhov, David R. Berk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Side effects may limit the use of current tetracycline-class antibiotics for acne. Objective: Evaluate the efficacy and safety of once-daily sarecycline, a novel, narrow-spectrum tetracycline-class antibiotic, in moderate to severe acne. Methods: Patients 9–45 years with moderate to severe facial acne (Investigator’s Global Assessment [IGA] score ≥3, 20–50 inflammatory and ≤100 noninflammatory lesions, and ≤2 nodules) were randomized 1:1 to sarecycline 1.5 mg/kg/day or placebo for 12 weeks in identically designed phase 3 studies (SC1401 and SC1402). Results: In SC1401 (sarecycline n=483, placebo n=485) and SC1402 (sarecycline n=519, placebo n=515), at week 12, IGA success (≥2-grade improvement and score 0 [clear] or 1 [almost clear]) rates were 21.9% and 22.6% (sarecycline), respectively, versus 10.5% and 15.3% (placebo; P<0.0001 and P=0.0038). Onset of efficacy in inflammatory lesions occurred by the first visit (week 3), with mean percentage reduction in inflammatory lesions at week 12 in SC1401 and SC1402 of −51.8% and −49.9% (sarecycline), respectively, versus −35.1% and −35.4% (placebo; P<0.0001). Onset of efficacy for absolute reduction of noninflammatory lesion count occurred at week 6 in SC1401 (P<0.05) and week 9 in SC1402 (P<0.01). In SC1401, the most common TEAEs (in ≥2% of either sarecycline or placebo group) were nausea (4.6% [sarecycline]; 2.5% [placebo]), nasopharyngitis (3.1%; 1.7%), headache (2.7%; 2.7%), and vomiting (2.1%; 1.4%) and, in SC1402, nasopharyngitis (2.5%; 2.9%) and headache (2.9%; 4.9%). Most were not considered treatment-related. Vestibular (dizziness, tinnitus, vertigo) and phototoxic (sunburn, photosensitivity) TEAEs both occurred in ≤1% of sarecycline patients. Gastrointestinal TEAE rates for sarecycline were low. Among females, vulvovaginal candidiasis (SC1401: 1.1% [sarecycline] and 0 [placebo]; SC1402: 0.3% and 0) and mycotic infection (0.7% and 0; 1.0% and 0) rates were low. Conclusion: The narrow-spectrum antibiotic sarecycline was safe, well tolerated, and effective for moderate to severe acne, with low rates of side effects common with tetracycline antibiotics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)987-996
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Drugs in Dermatology
Volume17
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

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