Ocular side effects from herbal medicines and nutritional supplements

Frederick W. Fraunfelder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To review the more significant herbal and nutritional agents of clinical importance to ophthalmologists and describe the ocular side effects for each. World Health Organization (WHO) classification and guidelines for clinicians are provided. Retrospective observational case series. A retrospective observational case series of reports of ocular side effects or systemic side effects from medications used for the eye from herbal medicines and nutritional supplements. Cases were collected from spontaneous reports submitted to the WHO, the Food and Drug Administration, and the National Registry of Drug-Induced Ocular Side Effects. A review of the world's literature was performed to obtain additional case reports and insight into adverse ocular reactions. Data were collected on age, gender, duration of therapy, concomitant medications, dosage, and dechallenge and rechallenge results. The National Registry of Drug-Induced Ocular Side Effects received 263 spontaneous reports, in addition to 60 case reports from the literature. Canthaxanthine, chamomile, Datura, Echinacea purpurea, Ginkgo biloba, licorice, niacin, and vitamin A are all associated with clinically significant ocular side effects. Herbal medicines and nutritional supplements can cause ocular side effects. Clinicians need to recognize these adverse events, because a large segment of the population uses them, many times without the treating physician's knowledge.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)639-647
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume138
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2004

Fingerprint

Herbal Medicine
Registries
Canthaxanthin
Datura
Chamomile
Echinacea
Glycyrrhiza
Ginkgo biloba
Niacin
United States Food and Drug Administration
Vitamin A
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Guidelines
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Ocular side effects from herbal medicines and nutritional supplements. / Fraunfelder, Frederick W.

In: American Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 138, No. 4, 10.2004, p. 639-647.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fraunfelder, Frederick W. / Ocular side effects from herbal medicines and nutritional supplements. In: American Journal of Ophthalmology. 2004 ; Vol. 138, No. 4. pp. 639-647.
@article{1fb933d087614a36bdaa39cdc5cb57c1,
title = "Ocular side effects from herbal medicines and nutritional supplements",
abstract = "To review the more significant herbal and nutritional agents of clinical importance to ophthalmologists and describe the ocular side effects for each. World Health Organization (WHO) classification and guidelines for clinicians are provided. Retrospective observational case series. A retrospective observational case series of reports of ocular side effects or systemic side effects from medications used for the eye from herbal medicines and nutritional supplements. Cases were collected from spontaneous reports submitted to the WHO, the Food and Drug Administration, and the National Registry of Drug-Induced Ocular Side Effects. A review of the world's literature was performed to obtain additional case reports and insight into adverse ocular reactions. Data were collected on age, gender, duration of therapy, concomitant medications, dosage, and dechallenge and rechallenge results. The National Registry of Drug-Induced Ocular Side Effects received 263 spontaneous reports, in addition to 60 case reports from the literature. Canthaxanthine, chamomile, Datura, Echinacea purpurea, Ginkgo biloba, licorice, niacin, and vitamin A are all associated with clinically significant ocular side effects. Herbal medicines and nutritional supplements can cause ocular side effects. Clinicians need to recognize these adverse events, because a large segment of the population uses them, many times without the treating physician's knowledge.",
author = "Fraunfelder, {Frederick W.}",
year = "2004",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1016/j.ajo.2004.04.072",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "138",
pages = "639--647",
journal = "American Journal of Ophthalmology",
issn = "0002-9394",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ocular side effects from herbal medicines and nutritional supplements

AU - Fraunfelder, Frederick W.

PY - 2004/10

Y1 - 2004/10

N2 - To review the more significant herbal and nutritional agents of clinical importance to ophthalmologists and describe the ocular side effects for each. World Health Organization (WHO) classification and guidelines for clinicians are provided. Retrospective observational case series. A retrospective observational case series of reports of ocular side effects or systemic side effects from medications used for the eye from herbal medicines and nutritional supplements. Cases were collected from spontaneous reports submitted to the WHO, the Food and Drug Administration, and the National Registry of Drug-Induced Ocular Side Effects. A review of the world's literature was performed to obtain additional case reports and insight into adverse ocular reactions. Data were collected on age, gender, duration of therapy, concomitant medications, dosage, and dechallenge and rechallenge results. The National Registry of Drug-Induced Ocular Side Effects received 263 spontaneous reports, in addition to 60 case reports from the literature. Canthaxanthine, chamomile, Datura, Echinacea purpurea, Ginkgo biloba, licorice, niacin, and vitamin A are all associated with clinically significant ocular side effects. Herbal medicines and nutritional supplements can cause ocular side effects. Clinicians need to recognize these adverse events, because a large segment of the population uses them, many times without the treating physician's knowledge.

AB - To review the more significant herbal and nutritional agents of clinical importance to ophthalmologists and describe the ocular side effects for each. World Health Organization (WHO) classification and guidelines for clinicians are provided. Retrospective observational case series. A retrospective observational case series of reports of ocular side effects or systemic side effects from medications used for the eye from herbal medicines and nutritional supplements. Cases were collected from spontaneous reports submitted to the WHO, the Food and Drug Administration, and the National Registry of Drug-Induced Ocular Side Effects. A review of the world's literature was performed to obtain additional case reports and insight into adverse ocular reactions. Data were collected on age, gender, duration of therapy, concomitant medications, dosage, and dechallenge and rechallenge results. The National Registry of Drug-Induced Ocular Side Effects received 263 spontaneous reports, in addition to 60 case reports from the literature. Canthaxanthine, chamomile, Datura, Echinacea purpurea, Ginkgo biloba, licorice, niacin, and vitamin A are all associated with clinically significant ocular side effects. Herbal medicines and nutritional supplements can cause ocular side effects. Clinicians need to recognize these adverse events, because a large segment of the population uses them, many times without the treating physician's knowledge.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=7044253250&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=7044253250&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ajo.2004.04.072

DO - 10.1016/j.ajo.2004.04.072

M3 - Article

C2 - 15488795

AN - SCOPUS:7044253250

VL - 138

SP - 639

EP - 647

JO - American Journal of Ophthalmology

JF - American Journal of Ophthalmology

SN - 0002-9394

IS - 4

ER -